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NPR

Back To Work After A Baby, But Without Health Insurance

Pardit Pri left her job as a legal assistant when she had a baby. She thought she'd be able to find a new job with health insurance, but so far has only found contract work with no benefits. She's not sure if her state's new health exchange will make sense for her, given her uncertain income.
NPR

Studying The Science Behind Child Prodigies

Matt Haimovitz is 42 and a world-renowned cellist. His mother took him to many concerts as a kid, but nothing in his family history explains where he got his extraordinary talent. And that's typical, says Ellen Winner, a psychology professor at Boston College who has spent much of her career studying prodigies.
NPR

Small Businesses May Find Insurance Relief In Exchanges

Small businesses can now buy health insurance tailored for their needs on marketplaces established by the Affordable Care Act. But it's not clear how much relief the exchanges will offer from high prices that are a longstanding problem for small business. And they will almost certainly require more paperwork.
NPR

A DEET-Like Mosquito Spray That Smells Like Jasmine Or Grapes?

Scientists have figured out how DEET repels mosquitoes. The finding has led the researchers to candidate repellents that are safer and cheaper than DEET and may provide new weapons against mosquito-borne scourges, such as malaria and dengue fever.
NPR

Fish Guidelines For Pregnant Women May Be Too Strict, Study Suggests

Since most fish contain some amount of mercury, public health officials suggest that pregnant women limit their intake to 12 ounces a week. But fresh research suggests current recommendations may be too cautious, and that fish may not be a huge source of mercury for expecting moms. Still, some doctors remain cautious.
NPR

Federal Funds For Meals On Wheels Tied Up In Shutdown

Alison Foreman is the executive director of Ypsilanti Meals On Wheels, which feeds about 200 elderly clients. She tells Melissa Block the government shutdown has tied up the federal money her program relies on to feed low-income seniors.
NPR

Is It Time To Cool It On Kale Already?

It's National Kale Day, folks. That prompts the question: Has the kale love gone too far? As we make kale the health halo food du jour, we risk turning it into the Gwyneth Paltrow of the vegetable world — a perceived goody two-shoes that, deservedly or not, everyone loves to hate on.
NPR

Why Eye Contact Can Fail To Win People Over

People are told that if you want to get a point across, look your audience straight in the eyes. But that works only if the person already agrees with you, a study finds. When people don't share the speaker's opinion, looking them in the eye may actually make them less likely to change their minds.
NPR

How Important Is Health Care Act To Latinas?

Ethnic Haitians living in the Dominican Republic are lashing out at the government's decision to strip them of Dominican citizenship. They say it's just another example of the ugly racial tension on the island shared by the two nations. Host Michel Martin speaks with Maria Cardona, Alicia Anabel Santos and Laura Martinez about this week's hot topics in the beauty shop.
NPR

Health Care Act Reminds Young Adults They're Not Invincible

Millennials are often dubbed "young invincibles" for their propensity to stay healthy, and forgo health insurance. Host Michel Martin speaks with Kaiser Health News correspondent Jenny Gold about how the Affordable Care Act will impact "invincibles," and how they might be the key to the program's success.

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