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Oklahoma Governor Faces Tough Decision On 'Sweeping' Anti-Abortion Bill

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has a few more days to decide what to do with a bill on her desk that would make it a felony for doctors to perform abortions. Opponents call the bill "sweeping and unprecedented."
WAMU 88.5

McAuliffe Signs Virginia State Budget But Vetoes Medicaid Restriction

McAuliffe favors expanding publicly funded healthcare for the poor in Virginia, something Republicans in the state legislature have strongly opposed.

NPR

New Labels Warn That A Tender Steak Could Be A Little Dangerous

Mechanically tenderized meat — which has been punctured with needles to break down the muscle fibers and make it easier to chew — has a greater chance of being contaminated and making you sick.
NPR

Doctors Without Borders Suspends Work In Parts Of Central African Republic

The group says armed men killed a staff member during an attack on a convoy that lasted more than 40 minutes. It's one of many recent attacks worldwide on the group's staff.
NPR

Why Doctors Without Borders Is Skipping The World Humanitarian Summit

The group pulled out this month, citing concerns that nations won't have to follow through on commitments made at the summit. We spoke with executive director Jason Cone.
NPR

The 'Added Sugar' Label Is Coming To A Packaged Food Near You

The Food and Drug Administration has brushed aside industry objections and will require food labels to disclose how much sugar has been added to packaged food.
NPR

Lawmakers Reach A Deal To Expand Regulation Of Toxic Chemicals

If it passes, the compromise bill would be the first update to the Toxic Substances Control Act in more than four decades. Supporters say it gives the EPA more power to ensure chemical safety.
NPR

CDC: 157 Pregnant Women In The U.S. Have Tested Positive For Zika

The women being monitored now include those who had positive lab tests but no symptoms, according to the CDC. Also affected are 122 women in U.S. territories, almost all in Puerto Rico.
NPR

People With HIV Are Less Likely To Get Needed Cancer Treatment

A third of patients with HIV and lung cancer failed to receive treatment for the cancer, compared with 14 percent of those who were HIV-negative. It's one example among many of disparate treatment.
NPR

Ravens Tackle Lobbies The NFL To Approve Medical Marijuana

Eugene Monroe tells Mary Louise Kelly that the NFL should stop testing players for marijuana. He reasons that players should be allowed to use the drug for medical purposes to treat chronic pain.

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