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Ebola: Then And Now

Much about what we know about Ebola was discovered in an outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1976. Joel Breman and Karl Johnson were among the first doctors to work on the outbreak.
NPR

Anesthesia Miracle: No Power, No Oxygen Tanks, No Problem

Frustrated by anesthesia machines that conked out when the power faltered, Dr. Paul Fenton came up with a solution: The Universal Anesthesia Machine.
NPR

What Microbes Lurked In The Last Public Restroom You Used?

A census of bacteria and viruses on the floors, toilets and soap dispensers of several bathrooms on a college campus turned up around 77,000 different types of organisms. Oh, joy.
NPR

You Might Be Surprised When You Take Your Temperature

Ebola has made us all obsessed with body temperature. 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit is normal, right? But what about 98.2? Or 99? And how high and low can you go on the thermometer and survive?
NPR

Plague Outbreak In Madagascar Spreads To Its Capital

Madagascar reports hundreds of plague cases each year. Health officials are concerned that this year's outbreak could grow rapidly now that it has reached a densely-populated city.
NPR

An Ebola Clinic Figures Out A Way To Start Beating The Odds

Staff members at a clinic in Sierra Leone were told to minimize treatments and expect few survivors. But they refused to follow that plan and came up with a safe way to boost the survival rate.
NPR

Georgia's 'Coverage Gap' Leaves Many Uninsured

The state did not expand Medicaid so many of their target audience — African-Americans and Latinos — may make too much to qualify for Medicaid but too little to get subsidies.
NPR

To Stay Energy Efficient As You Age, Keep On Running

People in their 60s who run for exercise use energy as efficiently as much younger people. That wasn't true for older people who walked instead.
NPR

In The Hospital, There's No Such Thing As A Lesbian Knee

People in the LGBT community often have a hard time getting appropriate health care. But the problems aren't unique to them. Doesn't everyone want to have a doctor call them by their preferred name?
NPR

The 2 Things That Rarely Happen After A Medical Mistake

When patients are harmed by a medical error, they rarely are told about it or given an apology, according to a study based on ProPublica's Patient Harm Questionnaire.

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