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NPR

How Animals Hacked The Rainbow And Got Stumped On Blue

There's more than one way to make color, nature tells us. And more than one way to use it to your own advantage.
NPR

The Prosthetics Industry Gets A Human Touch

The prosthetics industry is rapidly growing, allowing patients to better customize their devices, control them using their nervous system, and even regain a sense of touch.
NPR

Vet's Self-Cooling Prosthetic Could Help Amputees Beat The Heat

An Iraq war veteran has developed a better artificial leg with a cooling fan. Gary Walters says most prosthesis don't release heat, causing many amputees to stop wearing them.
NPR

Medicare Poised To Cover CT Scans To Screen For Lung Cancer

To qualify for coverage, patients would have to first meet with a doctor to talk through the pros and cons of scans, which involve a low-dose of radiation.
NPR

Surprise Medical Bills: ER Is In Network, But Doctor Isn't

When Jennifer Hopper's husband was hit in the eye with a baseball, she rushed him to a hospital she knew was within their insurance plan. Then the ER doctor sent her an extra bill for more than $700.
NPR

Affordable Care Act Has Many Political And Legal Challenges Ahead

The federal health exchange website is live this week for window shopping and people will begin to purchase new health insurance there on Saturday. But the Affordable Care Act still has many political and legal challenges ahead.
NPR

For Modern Women, 'Ladylike' Means Strong And Sporty

Over time the "ideal" woman's body seems to have gone from heroin-chic to healthy-and-fit. Women's magazines now advertise ways to be strong and sexy.
NPR

A Glimmer Of Hope In The Fight Against Hunger In America

The number of Americans struggling to afford food has remained stuck near recession-era highs. But a recent Gallup poll suggests things may be starting to get back on track for some.
NPR

The Burden Of Colon Cancer Shifts From Rich To Poor

Rates of colorectal cancer have dropped nationally, thanks to better screening. But people who don't have access to health care are more likely to miss out on screening, and face increased risk.
NPR

How 'The Hot Zone' Got It Wrong And Other Tales Of Ebola's History

Do people with Ebola actually cry tears of blood? What happens if the U.S. Army thinks you might have Ebola? We catch up with science writer David Quammen to discuss truths and myths about the virus.

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