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How Much Arsenic Is Safe In Apple Juice? FDA Proposes New Rule

The FDA's proposal would set a threshold of 10 parts per billion for inorganic arsenic in apple juice — the same standard used for drinking water. In 2011, a pair of investigations raised alarms about the levels of inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen, in the juice.
NPR

Heavy Rains Send Iowa's Precious Soil Downriver

The biggest loser from this year's heavy rains in the Midwest is the land itself. An environmental group says 50 townships in Iowa have lost more than five tons of topsoil per acre, "more than what is tolerable over an entire year."
NPR

Are Antibiotics On The Farm Risky Business?

Farmers give antibiotics routinely to pigs, beef cattle and poultry. They say the drugs help keep animals healthy and get them to market faster. Others say this practice practically guarantees that bacteria will develop resistance to these antibiotics more quickly, endangering human lives and the long-term viability of the drugs.
NPR

Why Doctors Oppose Force-Feeding Guantanamo Hunger Strikers

Doctors say a viral video demonstrating force-feeding helps expose the unethical treatment of Guantanamo detainees subjected to the procedure. Force-feeding is wrong, doctors say, because prisoners of sound mind have a right to refuse medical intervention, including nourishment.
NPR

Taste Of Grandma's Kitchen: We Hack An Old Ketchup Recipe

Jim Ledvinka grew up outside of Chicago watching his grandmother make ketchup from scratch once a year. As a kid, he hated the stuff. As a man — and now a grandfather — he became desperate to re-create it. That's where All Things Considered's Found Recipes project comes in.
NPR

Hipsters Off The Hook: The Truth Behind Abandoned Backyard Chickens

Unwanted chicks are filling up some city shelters around the country, and some activists are blaming fair-weather hipster farmers. But a closer look reveals another root cause: When urban farmers order hens, they often end up instead with roosters — illegal in many cities.
NPR

It's Not Just The Middle East With Quirky Booze Laws

Our commenters point out that the Middle East isn't the only place with confusing laws regulating the purchase and consumption of alcohol. Dry counties, wet counties, blue laws and mini-bottles: Jurisdictions across the U.S. also grapple with how to regulate alcohol sales.
NPR

The Science Of Twinkies: How Do They Last So Darned Long?

When Twinkies hit the stores again on July 15, their shelf life will be nearly twice as long as it used to be: 45 days. (We were surprised it wasn't longer.) There's a whole lot of food science employed to help the creme-filled cake defy the laws of baked-good longevity.
NPR

Smithfield Says Pork Won't Change, But Some Aren't Buying It

Worried about the impact on U.S. consumers, farmers and even taxpayers, some senators expressed qualms about the intentions of Shuanghui International Holdings, a Chinese firm that is buying Smithfield Foods.
NPR

Do Diet Drinks Mess Up Metabolisms?

A body of evidence suggests artificial sweeteners — most often consumed in diet drinks — could raise the risk of weight gain and type 2 diabetes. Some researchers think that artificial sugar may confuse the body.

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