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Hipsters Off The Hook: The Truth Behind Abandoned Backyard Chickens

Unwanted chicks are filling up some city shelters around the country, and some activists are blaming fair-weather hipster farmers. But a closer look reveals another root cause: When urban farmers order hens, they often end up instead with roosters — illegal in many cities.

It's Not Just The Middle East With Quirky Booze Laws

Our commenters point out that the Middle East isn't the only place with confusing laws regulating the purchase and consumption of alcohol. Dry counties, wet counties, blue laws and mini-bottles: Jurisdictions across the U.S. also grapple with how to regulate alcohol sales.

The Science Of Twinkies: How Do They Last So Darned Long?

When Twinkies hit the stores again on July 15, their shelf life will be nearly twice as long as it used to be: 45 days. (We were surprised it wasn't longer.) There's a whole lot of food science employed to help the creme-filled cake defy the laws of baked-good longevity.

Smithfield Says Pork Won't Change, But Some Aren't Buying It

Worried about the impact on U.S. consumers, farmers and even taxpayers, some senators expressed qualms about the intentions of Shuanghui International Holdings, a Chinese firm that is buying Smithfield Foods.

Do Diet Drinks Mess Up Metabolisms?

A body of evidence suggests artificial sweeteners — most often consumed in diet drinks — could raise the risk of weight gain and type 2 diabetes. Some researchers think that artificial sugar may confuse the body.
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The Ins And Outs Of Restaurant Reservations

Booking a table at your favorite eatery can take advance planning, strategic thinking and flexibility. We'll look behind the scenes at the inner workings of restaurant reservations.


Why Micro-Gardening Could Go Big

Micro-gardens are small spaces, such as balconies, patios and rooftops, cultivated with planting containers like wooden boxes and trash cans. Now, creative reuse of old materials and some new tools for sale are making it easier for urban dwellers to stretch their green thumbs.

As Biotech Seed Falters, Insecticide Use Surges In Corn Belt

Across the corn belt, farmers are pulling out all the stops in their war the corn rootworm. They're returning to chemical pesticides, because the weapons of biotechnology — inserted genes that are supposed to kill the rootworm — aren't working so well anymore.

Why There's Too Few Cooks For New York City's Elite Kitchens

New York is famous for its food scene, but lately, the once-overflowing pool of potential chef applicants has begun to run dry. The reason? It's a pricey town to live in, and for chefs obsessed with local ingredients, smaller towns with vibrant food cultures and closer ties to surrounding farms are looking way more appealing.

France Battles Scourge Of Ready-To-Eat Meals In Restaurants

French dining is world famous, but it has a dirty little secret: Many restaurants rely on microwavable, premade meals. A bill that's already cleared one big hurdle in the French National Assembly would force restaurants to label when their food is made in-house from scratch – and penalize those who lie about it.