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NPR

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

The giant retailer says it's adding a new line of organic food that's at least 25 percent cheaper. But a large-scale production and supply of organic food likely can't be achieved overnight.
NPR

In The Land Of Razor Clams, Dinner Hides Deep Within The Sand

Clam digging satisfies that primeval urge to go out into nature and find free food. And inveterate Washington state clam diggers admit they compete to get their daily limit of 15 clams.
NPR

Like Ham? There's A Festival For That In French Basque Country

The port town of Bayonne in France's Basque region is known for its colorful food and culture. And since 1464, its residents have celebrated the remarkable, local cured ham at the springtime Ham Fair.
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A Lime Shortage and Our Food Market

Ninety-eight percent of the limes consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, where a confluence of factors have led to a shortage of the fruit. We explore what's behind the spike in lime prices.

NPR

Hunting For The Tastiest Egg: Duck, Goose, Chicken Or Quail?

We hard-boiled them. We donned blindfolds. And we chowed down. In our eggsperiment, can you guess which bird prevailed in the ultimate showdown of duck vs. chicken?
NPR

Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea?

A shortage of gefilte fish is causing panic in the middle of Passover. But New York Times reporter Matt Chaban says some observant Jews are OK with not having to eat the love-it-or-hate-it appetizer.
NPR

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

On the eve of Easter and National Jelly Bean Day, let us probe the mysterious origins and unexpected ascendency of the humble candy. And to celebrate, we've sampled Jelly Belly's newest flavors.
NPR

Consider The Can: An Unlikely Twist On A Louisiana Dish

When Poppy Tooker was a kid, her favorite dish was her great-grandmother's Peas in a Roux. Only years later did Tooker discover that canned peas — not fresh or frozen — were the key to the recipe.
NPR

Chili Say What? Linguistics Help Pinpoint Pepper's Origins

It turns out the first chili peppers were grown by humans in eastern Mexico. And it's not the same region where beans and corn were first grown, according to new ways of evaluating evidence.
NPR

Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.

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