Food

RSS Feed
NPR

'Locally Laid': A Humorous Memoir To Cure You Of Farming Fantasies

When Jason Amundsen told his wife he was quitting his job to raise pasture-raised eggs, she was less than amused. Readers, however, will chuckle at the story of their tragicomic path to success.
NPR

Nitza Villapol: The Woman Who Taught Cubans To Cook With Just About Anything

For over 40 years, Villapol hosted a popular cooking show in Cuba, her recipes shifting to reflect the realities of life under the revolution. No meat? No problem — she fried plantain peels instead.
WAMU 88.5

Bon Appetit! The Power Of Michelin On D.C. Dining

This fall the prestigious Michelin Guide will include D.C. restaurants for the first time. We look at what the coveted Michelin stars mean for diners and the restaurant scene in a food town coming into its own.

NPR

Java Lovers, Rejoice: Coffee Doesn't Pose A Cancer Risk, WHO Panel Says

The World Health Organization's cancer research agency listed coffee as a possible carcinogen in 1991. But the body of evidence now suggests that's not the case, and coffee may even protect health.
NPR

Can The Soda Industry's $4 Million Ad Blitz Fend Off A Sugary Drink Tax?

Philadelphia's City Council on Thursday will vote on a 1.5 cents-per-ounce tax on sugary beverages, as well as on diet sodas. Big Soda is spending big bucks on ads to sway public opinion against it.
NPR

Tea Tuesday: Meet The Chai Wallahs Of India

Resham Gellatly and Zach Marks spent eight months traveling through India, meeting with hundreds of India's chai wallahs — or tea vendors — who highlight the country's culture and diversity.
NPR

'Moon Of The Faith:' A History Of The Apricot And Its Many Pleasures

The Romans dubbed it the "precious one." Poets praised its beauty. The conquering Arabs took it to the Mideast, where the luxurious fruit was exploited in sugary confections.
NPR

A Map Of Where Your Food Originated May Surprise You

A new study reveals the full extent of globalization in our food supply. More than two-thirds of the crops that underpin national diets originally came from somewhere else — often far away.
NPR

Celery: Why?

Considering humans' millennia-long struggle with famine, it's surprising anyone spent time or resources cultivating low-calorie celery. But the vegetable's original use had nothing to do with food.
NPR

Spring Is Swarm Season, When Beekeepers Are On The Hunt For New Hives

While a new neighborhood beehive can be stressful for homeowners, it's an exciting time for beekeepers. They see it as an opportunity to collect more colonies for their apiaries.

Pages