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Why Sugar Makes Us Feel So Good

Why does sugar leave our brains crying, "More! More! More!"? A neuroscientist and research psychologist who studies sugar addiction breaks it down for us in a clever new TED-Ed video.
NPR

Sometimes A Perfect Stranger Is The Best Dinner Host

A new food trend gaining popularity in New York and other cities allows diners to enjoy fine meals inside someone else's home. But the food is often just an excuse for what can essentially be a really great party with a bunch of people you've never met.
NPR

German Farmers Fear For Europe's Bacon With U.S. Trade Deal

German farmers protested Wednesday against a free trade deal with the U.S. that could lift restrictions on American meat sold in Europe. The farmers say they are worried not just about poor quality meat but about unfair competition.
NPR

Velveeta Shortage: 'Cheesepocalypse?'

Kraft Foods says there is a shortage of Velveeta cheese. It's a staple for queso-eating football fans, who are left wondering what will be on the menu for game day. For more, host Michel Martin speaks with Adrian Miller, author of Soul Food.
NPR

Where In The World Is The Best Place For Healthy Eating?

Researchers ranked countries in terms of how easy it is to get a balanced, nutritious diet. The U.S. didn't even make the top 20, even though it has the greatest abundance of cheap food in the world. Western Europe nearly swept the top 10. Guess which country was No. 1?
NPR

New Nordic Food Gods Loosen Up On Strictly Local Cuisine

The New Nordic chefs have helped make the flavors of Scandinavia — from reindeer to foraged fungi — among the most revered in the food world. But lately they've started talking about evolving their cooking beyond local ingredients.
NPR

Soon To Be Big In Japan, Jim Beam's Roots To Stay In Kentucky

In a deal worth some $16 billion, Japanese beverage giant Suntory is buying Beam Inc., maker of Jim Beam bourbon and owner of well-known American brands such as Maker's Mark. Industry leaders say it's a reflection of bourbon's exploding popularity in Asian markets, but some wonder if the new owners will preserve bourbon's Kentucky heritage.
NPR

Tobacco Returns To The Bar, This Time Inside Cocktails

Even as smoking bans spread across the U.S., mixologists are coming up with tobacco-infused tipples. But tobacco experts say these drinks could be risky because there's no way of knowing how much nicotine is in them.
NPR

Spinach Dinosaurs To Sugar Diamonds: 3-D Printers Hit The Kitchen

Pizza printed up for dinner? Or how about an edible photograph for your next birthday cake? The first restaurant-grade approved 3-D printer was unveiled last week, and the gadget can churn out candies in any shape imaginable. Other printers in the works make custom-shaped pastas and assemble ravioli and gnocchi.
NPR

Coffee Myth-Busting: Cup Of Joe May Help Hydration And Memory

A new study adds to the evidence that among everyday coffee drinkers, the old wives' tale that coffee will lead to dehydration is really just that: a tale. Another study found that caffeine may help to consolidate memories in the short term, but may not help retrieve old memories.

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