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The Great Dumpling Debate: What Makes The Cut?

The humble dumpling seems unencumbered by controversy until you start trying to define it. We asked three experts to weigh in. Tell us what you think, too.
NPR

In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings?

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from? Some think prehistoric people may have been cooking them up.
NPR

Dishwasher Cooking: Make Your Dinner While Cleaning The Plates

Surprisingly enough, people have been poaching salmon in their dishwashers for decades. Now one Italian cook has expanded the technique to meats, side dishes and desserts. And she's found a trick to make the method more environmentally friendly.
NPR

Wine Has Sommeliers. Now, Beer Has Cicerones

A new program is working to bring the same level of knowledge that sommeliers have about wine to the world of malt and hops, by turning out batches of certified beer experts known as cicerones.
NPR

Julia Child Was Wrong: Don't Wash Your Raw Chicken, Folks

The doyenne of TV chefs imparted much wisdom to American cooks, but one piece of Child's advice you should ignore is to wash your raw poultry before cooking. It spreads germs. Everywhere. Yet studies suggest 90 percent of Americans do it, so food safety researchers are launching a campaign to squash the habit.
NPR

Jack Daniel's To Expand Tennessee Distillery

It's already the No. 1 selling American whiskey, but Jack Daniel's sees huge potential as world-wide whiskey sales soar. The iconic company has announced a $100 million expansion of its distillery in tiny Lynchburg, Tenn.
NPR

Reviving An Heirloom Corn That Packs More Flavor And Nutrition

Imagine corn on the cob that naturally tastes creamy and buttery — no added fat required. Native Americans bred such a variety, but its kernels were almost lost to history. Now one chef is bringing back the heirloom corn — and hoping it will serve as a lesson in what can happen when crops are bred to be flavorful and colorful, not just big.
NPR

Stone Age Chefs Spiced Up Food Even 6,000 Years Ago

Looks like our prehistoric ancestors were bigger foodies than we realized. Archaeologists have found evidence that hunter-gatherers added a hot, mustard spice to their fish and meat thousands of years ago. So meals weren't just about consuming calories. Taste and flavor were important, too.
WAMU 88.5

VIDEO: Ben's Chili Bowl Celebrates 55 Years Of Half-Smokes And History

It's been over a half-century of half-smokes at Ben's Chili Bowl, and today the storied restaurant was celebrated by luminaries including comedian Bill Cosby.

NPR

In Canada, Maine Lobstermen Get Both A Rival And A Tutor

Lobsters are Maine's signature industry, but it's Canada who seems to be doing the better job of marketing its crustaceans. And as Maine lobstermen face record-low prices, the state is hoping to take a few lessons from the success of its northern neighbor.

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