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'Luncheon In Fur': The Surrealist Teacup That Stirred The Art World

In 1936, the surrealist Meret Oppenheim wrapped a teacup, saucer and spoon in fur. In the age of Freud, a gastro-sexual interpretation was inescapable. Even today, the work triggers intense reactions.
NPR

A New Generation Of Saudi Artists Pushes The Boundaries

Daring visual artists, whose edgy work challenges religious and political taboos, have become a critical voice in the conservative kingdom — where open calls for reform are a criminal offense.
NPR

Art World Captivated By 'Fake Rothko' Trial

The chairman of Sotheby's is suing a gallery that sold him a fake Mark Rothko painting. That trial is underway in Manhattan. Mary Louise Kelly talks to Noah Charney, author of The Art of Forgery.
NPR

Portraits Of LA's Female Artists Send A Powerful Message: 'You Are Here'

Rebecca Campbell's portrait series documents the female artists who go unnoticed or underrepresented. "I made it so that they didn't disappear," she says.
NPR

Symphony Of The City: Nigerian Artist Draws Songs From The Bustling Market

Emeka Ogboh's exhibition, "Market Symphony," brings listeners the rich sounds of a Lagos market. "There are stories in the soundscape," he tells NPR's Michel Martin. "There are stories from the city."
NPR

Walter Martin Remembers Art History Class With 'Arts + Leisure'

The Walkmen musician has gone solo with his new record. It's a song cycle inspired what Martin calls his "shaky grasp of college art history."
NPR

What Might Rouhani Have Missed When Rome Boxed Up The Nudes?

NPR's Scott Simon wonders if Iranian President Hassan Rouhani might have appreciated a moment to gaze at the many works of art in Rome's Capitoline Museum, rather than seen the naked statues boxed up.
NPR

Art Forgery Trial Asks: Were Dealers Duped, Or Did They Turn A Blind Eye?

In 2011, New York City's oldest gallery was accused of selling paintings it now admits were forgeries. Plaintiffs say the gallery overlooked glaring problems with the paintings' backstories.
NPR

Boston Museum Acquires First Painting Frida Kahlo Ever Sold

Kahlo painted Dos Mujeres (Salvadora y Herminia) in 1928 and sold it in 1929. Conservators at the Museum of Fine Arts say the maids in the portrait may have cared for Kahlo after a violent car crash.
NPR

Massive Cover-Up: Nude Statues In Italy Deemed Too Racy For Iran's President

Works of art at a museum in Rome were covered up before a visit this week by President Hassan Rouhani, and nobody claims to know who gave the order.

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