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WAMU 88.5

How Hot Are D.C.'s 'Heat Islands'?

Ever wonder how much D.C.'s black pavement and roofing heats up the city in the summer? We have answers.

WAMU 88.5

One Bird's Haunting Lesson For Us, 100 Years After Its Death

In the late 1800s, passenger pigeons filled the skies in the U.S. By 1914, there was just one left.

NPR

Groundwater Is Drying Up Fast Under Western States, Study Finds

The Colorado River Basin, which supplies irrigation and groundwater for most of the West, is drying up faster than expected. Part of the problem is a drought-driven over-reliance on groundwater.
NPR

Is Fracking To Blame For Increase In Quakes In Oklahoma?

Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
WAMU 88.5

With Styrofoam Ban, Environmentalists Hope For Cleaner Anacostia

Starting in January 2016, Styrofoam containers will be banned in D.C., a move that environmental advocates say will help clean up the long-polluted Anacostia River.
NPR

Farming The Bluefin Tuna, Tiger Of The Ocean, Is Not Without A Price

Scientists are trying to raise prized bluefin tuna completely in captivity. An experiment at a Baltimore university is the first successful attempt in North America.
NPR

Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Choose Mackerel Over Shrimp

Sardines and other small, oily fish are some of the most nutritious in the sea. Now there's another reason to eat them: Fishermen use a lot less fuel to catch them than many other kinds of seafood.
NPR

Widely Used Insecticides Are Leaching Into Midwest Rivers

Researchers found that a class of chemicals similar to nicotine and used on corn and soy farms has run off into streams and rivers in the Midwest. There they may be harming aquatic life, like insects.
NPR

White House Says Delayed Action On Climate Change Could Cost Billions

The White House says the cost of inaction outweighs the cost of implementing more-stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.
NPR

This Albino Redwood Tree Isn't Dead — But It Came Close

An extremely rare, albino hermaphroditic redwood tree was in danger of being sent to the chipper because it was growing too close to the path of a new railroad line in Cotati, Calif. But thanks to local outcry from arborists and the community, the tree is getting a second chance at life.

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