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New Recycling Company Springs From Old Mattresses

Old mattresses are among the worst kinds of household waste — recyclers don't want them, and neither do most landfills. A new business that started as a college project hopes to move mattress recycling into the mainstream, employing former convicts in the process.
WAMU 88.5

GWU Students Compete To Collect Cell Phones

George Washington University students have been mobilized to collect 20,000 used cell phones, which the school plans to recycle to pay for charity projects in Africa.

NPR

Ski Resorts Blow Fake Snow For A 'Brown' Winter

Normally at this time of year, about 50 percent of the U.S. is snow-covered.These days, the figure is now more like 20 percent. It's hurting ski resorts and the local economies that thrive on seasonal winter tourism.
WAMU 88.5

Toxic Chemicals Found In Groundwater Under Fort Detrick

High levels of toxic chemicals are still present in the groundwater beneath a former dumpsite at Fort Detrick.

NPR

Cordova, Alaska, Still Snowed In

Cordova, Alaska, continues to accumulate piles of snow. Melissa Block talks with resident and innkeeper Wendy Rainey.
NPR

New Tuberculosis Strain Thwarts All Antibiotics

Physicians in India have discovered a strain of tuberculosis they call 'TDR' for 'Totally Drug-Resistant'--meaning there is no antibiotic available to fight it. Maryn McKenna, author of Superbug, discusses the possible origins of the strain, and what options--if any--doctors have to treat it.
NPR

Talking Science With Arianna Huffington

The new year marks the creation of a science section at The Huffington Post. The Internet newspaper's editor-in-chief, Arianna Huffington discusses the story selection and vetting process. And why the launch coincides with what she calls the explosion of medieval thinking.
NPR

Get Inked For Science

Writer Carl Zimmer became an "unintentional curator" of science-themed tattoos after noticing a double helix on a friend's arm. Sensing a trend, he asked his blog readers to send photos of their science tattoos. Some of those images are gathered in his new book Science Ink.
NPR

Mild Winter Could Hurt Western States Water Supply

Across much of Colorado, Utah, Montana and northern California, the snowpack is at less than half the average. There are concerns the skimpy snowpack won't fill the reservoirs and rivers. Millions of people depend on melting snow for their drinking water and farms.

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