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NPR

Printing Solar Panels In The Backyard

With crowd-sourced funding through Kickstarter, a team of inventors are building a Solar Pocket Factory: a machine designed to print micro solar panels--like the ones used in phone chargers and garden lights. Co-inventor Shawn Frayne stopped by Flora Lichtman's backyard with a few pieces of the prototype to explain how the machine works.
NPR

The Ugly Truth About Food Waste in America

Each year, Americans waste 33 million tons of food. Dana Gunders, a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council, and author Jonathan Bloom discuss the economic and environmental impacts of food waste, and what can be done to fight the growing problem.
WAMU 88.5

Programs Imitate People In Experimental Eco-House

At a new experimental house run by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, software programs replicate the day-to-day activities of humans. The goal is to demonstrate that an energy-efficient house can be "net zero," not consuming more energy than it produces.

WAMU 88.5

Fairfax County Joins Virginia In Suing EPA Over Runoff

New standards for controlling stormwater runoff have brought together Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli and the Fairfax County government in a suit against the EPA.

NPR

Hungry Snakes Trap Guam In Spidery Web

Forests on the island of Guam are experiencing a spider epidemic, and invasive brown tree snakes are to blame. The snakes have nearly obliterated the island's native forest birds — which used to keep spider numbers in check.
WAMU 88.5

Debate Over Mandated Flame Retardant Chemicals In Furniture

Most couches sold in the U.S. contain flame retardants, but critics argue these chemicals pose a serious health risk. Debate on the health risks of flame retardants in furniture.

NPR

What Drove Early Man Across Globe? Climate Change

Some of the biggest human migrations coincided with major changes in climate, according to a new analysis. Researchers say early humans set out in search of climates where more food was available. And some populations stayed put in certain locations because barriers like glaciers blocked their progress.
NPR

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

After a mild winter and a late-April freeze, Michigan's apple harvest was decimated. Less fruit means fewer picking jobs. It also means little to no income from apples in storage that growers rely on to get them through to next year's harvest.

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