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Drilling Team Finally Hits Antarctica's Liquid Lake

After years of trying, Russian scientists say they have drilled into an Antarctic lake that is buried beneath more than two miles of ice. They are looking for signs of life that haven't been exposed to sky in 20 million years.
WAMU 88.5

Bag Tax Could Soon Hit Prince George's County

Prince George's County may soon join Montgomery County in the District of Columbia with the implementation of a 5-cent tax on plastic bags.

WAMU 88.5

Interior Department Okays Offshore Wind For Md., Va.

Offshore wind turbines in Maryland and Virginia get the go ahead from the U.S. Department of the Interior, and Republicans are looking for similar treatment for offshore drilling. 

WAMU 88.5

Virginia Oyster Population Rebounds, Still Far Off Highs

Oyster populations in the Chesapeake Bay are a far cry from what they once were, but recent conservation efforts have made significant impacts.


20 Million Years Later, Russians Work To Drill Into Lake

Russian researchers in Antarctica are on the verge of piercing a hole through two miles of ice into an ancient lake, untouched by the light of day for some 20 million years. But it'll be a delicate process to break through without disturbing the pristine waters. Guest host David Green speaks with Antarctic researcher John Priscu about the process.

Sturgeon Scarcity Affects More Than Caviar

Sturgeon have been swimming around for more than 200 million years, but their eggs are sought after for caviar. This week, the National Marine Fisheries Service placed the Atlantic sturgeon on its endangered species list. Guest host David Greene speaks with Dr. Ellen Pikitch, executive director of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science at Stony Brook University.

'Arctic Oscilliation' Behind Season's Mixed Winter Weather

For snow fans in the contiguous US, this winter has left much to be desired. The warm and mild season in the lower 48 and the wild snow dumps and cold weather up north in Alaska can be blamed largely on a weather pattern called "arctic oscillation." Audie Cornish gets an explanation of the weather phenomenon from meteorologist Jeffrey Masters.

New USDA Map May Mean Earlier Planting In North

A new map from the USDA has some northern gardeners hoping to grow plants that used to be considered too fragile for cold weather zones. The hardiness zone chart is about a half zone warmer than the last one issued in 1990. The USDA says the changes are not due to global warming, but to more sophisticated mapping methods. Seed sellers and buyers say that, whatever the reason, the warmer temperatures expand possibilities for planting this spring.