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NPR

Despite Risk, Many Residents Can't Resist The Water

According to 2010 Census data, more than half of all Americans live within 50 miles of the coast, and still more live by rivers and lakes. Living by water can present a danger, but for many who choose to live there, the draw of the water outweighs the perceived risks.
NPR

Sky-High Vegetables: Vertical Farming Sprouts In Singapore

Urban farming goes vertical, as Singapore opens a 30-feet tall greenhouse for bok choy and cabbage. The farm is already producing half a ton of veggies per day for local supermarkets. But are these vertical "farmscrapers" any more efficient than traditional, flat greenhouses?
WAMU 88.5

Maryland Biologists Save Turtles From Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy affected much of Assateague Island's land and some wildlife, but a nest of loggerhead turtle hatchlings were saved from the storm.

NPR

Climate Change Takes Flight in New Novel

Writer Barbara Kingsolver is one of a handful of novelists with a science background, and she puts it to use in her new novel Flight Behavior. Kingsolver discusses the book and why she chose to look at the the issue of climate change in a fictional work set in rural Tennessee.
NPR

Scientists Solve Mystery of Earth's Shifting Poles

Did you know that Earth's solid exterior can move around over its core, causing the planet's poles to wander back and forth? Adam Maloof, associate professor of geosciences at Princeton University, discusses the consequences of these shifts, and what may be causing them.
NPR

Hurricane Sandy Claims Thousands of NYU Lab Mice

Hurricane Sandy battered cities along the East Coast last week, and scientists at New York University were left reeling after thousands of lab mice at a research facility drowned due to flooding from the storm. How will the loss of these animals impact scientific research?
NPR

Can Dumping Iron Into The Sea Fight Climate Change?

Climate and ocean scientists are questioning a "rogue" experiment off the Canadian coast. A native village dumped hundreds of tons of iron into the water to cause a bloom of plankton, which would then capture greenhouse gases.

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