Environment

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WAMU 88.5

Ahead Of The Curve On Curbside Composting?

Several local jurisdictions are taking a chance on the idea that curbside-composting pickup could not only help the environment, but ultimately save taxpayers money.

NPR

1960s Satellite Images Add To Evidence Of Shrinking Sea Ice

A new analysis of images taken from one of the first U.S. weather satellites appears to confirm shrinking Arctic sea ice.
WAMU 88.5

Montgomery County Looks To Scale Back Bag Tax

The bag tax in Montgomery County has generated twice the revenue lawmakers initially expected. The county council is introducing a measure to scale back when the tax is applied.

NPR

For Corn, Fickle Weather Makes For Uncertain Yields

Corn production was down last year thanks to drought. This year, conditions are too cold and wet for farmers to plant the crop. Without a break in the clouds pretty soon, there may be another shortage of the crop at harvest time.
NPR

Want To Forage In Your City? There's A Map For That

Apples, oranges and ... squirrel? A new interactive map pinpoints more than a half-million locations around the world open to foraging for typical and not-so-typical free foods.

WAMU 88.5

Ongoing Debate Over Fracking Regulation

A New York court rules local governments can ban the practice of hydraulic fracturing. Diane and her guests discuss the ongoing debate over fracking and its impact on U.S. energy prices.

NPR

This Scientist Aims High To Save The World's Coral Reefs

Ken Caldeira is trying to come up with a big solution to the problem of increasingly acid oceans: antacids for coral reefs. That might keep the reefs from being destroyed by humans' use of fossil fuels. And that's not his only big idea. But even Caldeira admits that his audacious plan could fail.
NPR

This Building Is Supergreen. Will It Be Copied?

The Bullitt Foundation's new Seattle headquarters, billed as the world's "greenest" building, is designed to be entirely self-sustaining. The developers hope it can inspire others to build this way.
NPR

Thirsty States Take Water Battle To Supreme Court

Texas and Oklahoma are fighting over access to the Red River. Fast-growing Texas is eager to fuel its expansion in a time of drought, while the poorer state of Oklahoma is water-rich. There's an agreement in place to make distribution equitable, but fairness is arguable.

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