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Humans' Role In Antarctic Ice Melt Is Unclear

Ten years ago, a piece of ice the size of Rhode Island disintegrated and melted in the waters off Antarctica. Two other massive ice shelves along the Antarctic Peninsula had suffered similar fates a few years before. The events became poster children for the effects of global warming. But a new study finds that the story isn't quite so simple.

Drought Forces Ranchers Into Difficult Decisions

This summer's brutal drought has put ranchers in a difficult position; water and feed are running low and ruinously expensive to replace. NPR's Neal Conan speaks to stricken ranchers and agricultural economist Norman Dalsted about how to deal with the drought, and what to expect in terms of food prices.

Meet A Man On A Mission To Save Rare And Unusual Figs

Bassem Samaan of Bethlehem, Pa., is on a quest to save rare varieties of figs often growing unnoticed, right under our noses in neighbors' backyards. He's donated some of his finds to a government-backed fruit tree preserve in California.
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Federal Court Rules Against EPA Downwind Pollution Rule

A federal court has ruled that the EPA cannot crack down on power plant pollution that contributes to unhealthy air quality in plants' neighboring states. 


Ruling Is A Set-Back To Obama's Clean Air Plan

A federal court has rejected a rule that would have regulated air pollution that blows from one state to the next. The ruling puts a damper on the Obama administration's efforts to reduce asthma, heart disease and other ailments related to air pollution. States and utilities asserted that the rules overstepped the EPA's authority under the Clean Air Act.

Boston Plans For 'Near-Term Risk' Of Rising Tides

In Boston, scientists are predicting that climate change will lead to dramatic sea level rise, and more frequent flooding, around the city. Officials are studying the potential impact on roads and sewers and are asking waterfront developers to plan for increased flooding.

Saltwater From Gulf Invades Mississippi River

All the dry weather means there's less water flowing through the once mighty river into the Gulf of Mexico, and low outflow means saltwater from the Gulf is creeping in. Some Louisiana cities have already begun purchasing drinking water, and now New Orleans is at risk.