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NPR

Firm Blamed In The Costliest Onshore Oil Spill Ever

More than 800,000 gallons of crude oil gushed into wetlands and a creek in western Michigan in 2010 after a pipeline operated by the Canadian company Enbridge burst. Now, the National Transportation Safety Board says the company and the agency that regulates it are culpable.
NPR

Intense Heat Has Lasting Impact Across U.S.

2012 is off to the warmest start since at least 1895, when record-keeping began. While the latest heat wave finally broke across much of the U.S., it factored in dozens of deaths and forced many employers to shift workers' schedules. The intense heat also left many farmers and ranchers scrambling.
NPR

Rising Shale Water Complicates Fracking Debate

Naturally polluted water from the Marcellus Shale can rise up through the natural-gas-rich rock formation to the surface. That means that water used in fracking potentially could, too. The water may be making its way up through natural fractures in the earth or old oil and gas wells.
NPR

Tell the World Your Big Idea With NPR's 'What's Your Big Idea?' Video Contest

Do you have a good idea? Something that could change the world? NPR wants to know. Our new "What's Your Big Idea?" video contest will showcase the big ideas of people ages 13 to 25. It's all part of our exploration of the process of innovation and invention. So, what's your big idea?
WAMU 88.5

Local Leaders Track Progress On Chesapeake Bay Cleanup

The region's top lawmakers will today assess their progress on cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay

NPR

Parts Of U.S. Still Gripping With Record Heat

The heat is continuing to shatter records across the Midwest. Indiana is among the states being smothered by triple-digit temperatures and excessive heat warnings are in effect, but still many Hoosiers have to work out in the dangerous conditions. Sara Wittmeyer from member station WFIU reports on how people are coping during the heat wave and when they might see some relief.
NPR

How One Drought Changed Texas Agriculture Forever

Texas farmers were boggled in the 1950s when rain refused to fall for seven years. Crops and livestock suffered from the drought, which later spurred water planning initiatives so the state could survive in the event of another dry spell. Some growers still recall what's colloquially called "the drouth."

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