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Debate Revs As Decision Stalls Over Oil Pipeline From Canada

Five years ago, a Canadian company proposed building the Keystone XL pipeline to connect Canada's tar sands oil development with the big U.S. refineries on the Gulf Coast. The southern stretch of this pipeline is nearly finished, but the northern stretch is still under study.
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Invasive Snakehead Fish Continues To Populate Potomac

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is continuing to battle the invasive snakehead fish, which can harm native species in the Potomac.

NPR

Remote Antarctic Trek Reveals A Glacier Melting From Below

After several years planning the difficult mission, scientists successfully drilled through Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier. They were stunned by what they found, and worry global sea levels could be at risk.
NPR

Spy Drones Turning Up New Data About Hurricanes And Weather

For the past couple of years, NASA has been using remotely piloted aircraft to study hurricanes. And they are turning up new information about things like how dust from Africa can determine whether weather systems become hurricanes in the Atlantic.
NPR

Hawaii: 'Let Nature Take Its Course' On Molasses Spill

Authorities say the sweet slick has suffocated thousands of fish and could lead to an increase in predator species in the area.
NPR

Predicting The Future

Visions of the future don't just have to come from science fiction. There's very real technology today giving us clues about how our future lives might be transformed. So what might our future look like? And what does it take for an idea about the future to become a reality? In this hour, TED speakers make some bold predictions and explain how we might live in the future.
NPR

'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways

The chemistry of dozens of streams and rivers across the U.S. is changing. Waters are becoming more alkaline — the opposite of acidic. And the reason is counterintuitive — researchers believe that acid rain is to blame.
NPR

Discovery Of Massive Aquifers Could Be Game Changer For Kenya

The underground lakes were found in the most arid region of a country where 40 percent of the population lacks access to safe water.
NPR

Dust Bowl Worries Swirl Up As Shelterbelt Buckles

When the swirling, howling winds of the 1930s Dust Bowl gobbled up farmland from Texas to the Dakotas, the federal government planted 100 million trees to act like a giant windbreak. It worked. But now, after years of drought, those old trees are dying.
NPR

From The Fall Of Failure, Success Can Take Flight

Risking and embracing failure is part of the job for explorers and adventurers like aeronaut Salomon August Andrée. His fatal attempt at reaching the North Pole motivated others to push their own limits. The September issue of National Geographic investigates "famous failures" and why they mattered.

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