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Dust Bowl Worries Swirl Up As Shelterbelt Buckles

When the swirling, howling winds of the 1930s Dust Bowl gobbled up farmland from Texas to the Dakotas, the federal government planted 100 million trees to act like a giant windbreak. It worked. But now, after years of drought, those old trees are dying.
NPR

From The Fall Of Failure, Success Can Take Flight

Risking and embracing failure is part of the job for explorers and adventurers like aeronaut Salomon August Andrée. His fatal attempt at reaching the North Pole motivated others to push their own limits. The September issue of National Geographic investigates "famous failures" and why they mattered.
NPR

Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors

Snowshoe hares rely on camouflage, turning white in the winter to match the snow, and then turning brown for the summer. But a changing climate could mean fewer days with snow on the ground, and more days when they're visible to prey.
WAMU 88.5

Maryland Phases In New Fertilizer Regulations

Maryland's new fertilizer regulations are designed to use new research to reduce the amount of phosphorus that gets into waterways.

NPR

Captured Sounds From Ausable Marsh

Summer's winding down, but it's still hot and muggy enough for a canoe trek to one of the wildest places in New York state. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann sends an audio postcard from Ausable Marsh, in the Champlain Valley.
NPR

Immense Underwater Volcano Is The Biggest On Earth

Scientists report in the journal Nature Geoscience that they've uncovered the largest volcano on Earth in the Northwest Pacific Ocean, about 1,000 miles east of Japan. In fact it's one of the largest in the solar system, second only to Olympus Mons on Mars. Scientists have been studying the massive structure for decades, but now are confirming it's a single volcano about the size of New Mexico. It rises about four miles off the sea floor, but doesn't break through the ocean surface. Called Tamu Massif, it hasn't erupted in more than 130 million years, helping to keep its true nature secret.
NPR

Deep In The Pacific, Scientists Discover Biggest Volcano On Earth

Tamu Massif, first thought to be perhaps dozens of individual volcanoes, turns out to be just one — but it's really big. It's about the size of New Mexico.
WAMU 88.5

Langdon Cook: "The Mushroom Hunters"

How exotic mushrooms make it from the field to our plates. A mushroom forager takes us into the underground world of hunting for porcinis, morels and truffles.

NPR

Scientists Look Into Reasons For 2012's Dramatic Weather

Scientists looking back on last year's extreme weather events conclude that human-induced climate change didn't cause any of the events, but appears to have made some of them worse. The results are published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.
NPR

BP Wants To Halt Deepwater Horizon Claims Process

BP is fighting the settlement it agreed to last summer that let the oil company avoid thousands of potential lawsuits over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. BP now says the claim process is corrupt and wants to stop all the money flowing from its claims fund.

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