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Virginia Landfills Not A Threat To Drinking Water, DEQ Says

Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality is downplaying concerns that the commonwealth's landfills represent a threat to drinking water, citing siting and safety requirements.

NPR

"Resilience" Looks At How Things Bounce Back

In their new book, Resilience, Andrew Zolli and Ann Marie Healy examine how institutions and people respond to disruptions. By studying how systems--from coral reefs to Lehman Brothers--respond to change, Zolli argues that we can be better prepared for unexpected events.
WAMU 88.5

A Drought's Impact On Our Energy Grid

Record-setting droughts in the Midwest and South are threatening more than crops: half of the nation's water goes to cooling power plants.

NPR

Drought Threatens Small Town's Big Boat Race

For more than 25 years, a tiny town in northern Illinois has hosted a national powerboat competition. It attracts thousands of people who spend much-needed money in the sleepy village of DePue. But the ongoing drought is threatening this year's competition: To get enough water on the lake, the town needs to pump 650 million gallons out of a nearby river. Mike Moen reports from member station WNIJ.
NPR

In Drought-Stricken Midwest, It's Fodder Vs. Fuel

As the drought continues to afflict the nation's corn belt, hog and chicken farmers are competing with ethanol factories for scarce and increasingly expensive corn. Meat producers say it's not a fair competition, because government rules call for a minimum level of ethanol production, no matter what the cost. They're campaigning for a suspension of those rules.
NPR

Greenland Ice Sheet Melts At Abnormal Blazing Speed

In July, the surface of Greenland's ice sheet melted at an unusually fast rate. In the span of four days, an estimated 97 percent of the ice disappeared. Audie Cornish talks to NASA scientist Tom Wagner for more.
NPR

Massive Ice Melt In Greenland Worries Scientists

A pair of NASA satellite images taken just four days apart tells a potentially worrying story of melting ice in the polar summer.

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