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Recipe For Safer Drinking Water? Add Sun, Salt And Lime

Adding dirt and salt can help make drinking water cleaner, and is far cheaper than fancy filtration systems for getting rid of harmful bacteria, scientists say. It just takes a little patience and the sun.
NPR

Drilling Boom Strains State Regulatory Agencies

Cash-strapped states are embracing the millions of dollars in new tax revenue coming from shale oil and gas development. But there aren't enough inspectors to make sure the sites aren't polluting. The problem seems especially apparent in Colorado, which now has more than 47,000 active oil and gas wells but the state employs just 17 inspectors.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Participates In Climate Impacts Day

In honor of Climate Impacts Day, environmental activists are showing Virginia residents that climate change is taking a toll now.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Area Activities Planned For Climate Impacts Day

Environmental activists around the region are joining in a global day of action on climate change.

NPR

Is Thorium A Magic Bullet For Our Energy Problems?

As the search for cheap, safe and non-carbon emitting sources of energy continues, a band of scientists say the answer may be nuclear reactors fueled by thorium. Others caution that thorium reactors pose waste and proliferation risks. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the pros and cons of thorium reactors.
NPR

Gauging Public Opinion on Climate Change Policy

Majorities of Americans say that global warming and clean energy should be among the nation's priorities, according to a new survey. Will those feelings translate into any action in the government? Anthony Leiserowitz of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication discusses the survey's findings.
NPR

Fracking: New Rules Aim To Bring 'Best Practices' To Public Lands

Among the proposals: Requiring companies that are extracting natural gas to disclose the chemicals they use.
NPR

Greenland's Ice Melting More Slowly Than Expected

While the glaciers hold enough water to raise sea level feet by 20 feet, a new study says the runaway meltdown of Greenland's ice isn't happening as some had feared. This means a "worst-case scenario" of 6 feet of sea level rise by the end of this century is unlikely, a polar researcher says.

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