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NPR

As Ballot Deadline Looms, A Muddied Debate Over Colo. Fracking

Colorado is embroiled in debate over how to regulate oil and gas development. Up to four energy-related issues could be on the November ballot, and the run-up is causing confusion among voters.
NPR

Taste For Rare, Wild Pangolin Is Driving The Mammal To Extinction

The meat of this scaly, ant-eating creature has become a luxury food for some newly-rich Asians. But all eight pangolin species are now threatened by extinction, with two critically endangered.
NPR

As Wildfires Burn Through Funds, Washington Seeks New Way To Pay

Wildfires are ravaging the West Coast, burning homes and prompting evacuations. Responding to wildfires has proven costly and now the Obama administration is reevaluating how it pays to fight them.
NPR

The Gift Of Graft: New York Artist's Tree To Grow 40 Kinds Of Fruit

Syracuse artist Sam Van Aken is developing a tree that will bloom in pink, purple and red in the spring and bear 40 different fruit in the summer and fall. It's part art, part agricultural marvel.
NPR

Guess Who's Been Waiting In The Lobby For A Hundred Million Years?

The M-Thing. It's patient. It's modest. It's relentless. It stays.
NPR

Tensions Stir At EPA Hearings On New Emission Rules

As the EPA develops new carbon emission rules for existing power plants, the agency is holding a series of public hearings around the country where coal industry advocates made their concerns known.
NPR

Should We Return The Nutrients In Our Pee Back To The Farm?

A group of environmentalists in Vermont aren't at all squeamish about "pee-cycling." A local hay farmer is using their pee as fertilizer as they run tests to find out how safe it is for growing food.
WAMU 88.5

How Hot Are D.C.'s 'Heat Islands'?

Ever wonder how much D.C.'s black pavement and roofing heats up the city in the summer? We have answers.

WAMU 88.5

One Bird's Haunting Lesson For Us, 100 Years After Its Death

In the late 1800s, passenger pigeons filled the skies in the U.S. By 1914, there was just one left.

NPR

Groundwater Is Drying Up Fast Under Western States, Study Finds

The Colorado River Basin, which supplies irrigation and groundwater for most of the West, is drying up faster than expected. Part of the problem is a drought-driven over-reliance on groundwater.

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