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NPR

As Population, Consumption Rise, Builder Goes Small

As the world's population tops 7 billion people, population experts are worried about inevitable increases in cars, computers, bigger homes and a drain on resources. In an effort to combat this, one California company is producing small, energy-efficient homes — some as tiny as 300 square feet.
NPR

Automakers Want To Cut The Cord On Electric Cars

Plugging in an electric car — or parking it on a charging mat — may soon be a thing of the past. Robert Siegel talks to Rachel Kaufman of Scientific American about the new developments to boost car batteries on the go.
NPR

After Scandal, Solar Industry Looks On Bright Side

At an international solar convention, companies were optimistic about their future and new products. There are certainly causes for concern in the industry — like a looming controversy over China's subsidization practices — but industry executives point to fast growth and new ideas in the market.
NPR

The Global Coal Trade's Complex Calculation

Increasing U.S. coal exports to China doesn't necessarily mean global emissions will rise. As demand abroad drives up coal prices at home, it could prompt U.S. utilities to switch to cheaper and more environmentally friendly natural gas. And that might alter the politics of climate change in the U.S., an expert says.
NPR

A Local Fight Against Global Coal In A Northwest Town

Plans are afoot to build new coal terminals on the West Coast to ship the lucrative commodity to China. But the mayor and activists in Bellingham, Wash., want to keep the city's green image and move beyond its industrial past.
NPR

Expedition Looks For Crude In Sunken Oil Tanker

The oil tanker S.S. Montebello was sunk by a Japanese submarine during World War II off the coast of California. A recent expedition to the wreck found that oil believed to still be in the ship is not there. It's full of seawater. It's the Al Capone's vault of the sea, if you will.

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