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WAMU 88.5

Public Input Welcome At Fracking Meeting In Western Maryland

The Marcellus Shale Advisory Commission is holding a public meeting Monday evening to keep residents of Western Maryland in the loop on the latest developments on natural gas fracking in their area.

WAMU 88.5

Maryland Lawmakers Begin Talks On State's Utility Issues

Maryland lawmakers will hold the first statewide roundtable discussion this week on the reliability and resiliency of the state's electrical distribution system.

NPR

Drivers Wonder Where Price Of Gas Will Go Next

The price of gas has been on a roller coaster this year. After a brief dip in early summer, the average price per gallon is back on the upswing. That's left many consumers wondering if prices will go even higher, but some analysts expect the most recent spike to be relatively short-lived.
NPR

When This Oil Spills, It's 'A Whole New Monster'

What could be worse than a ruptured pipeline of crude oil? A ruptured pipeline of tar sands oil — a thick, sticky substance. Cleanup of a 2010 spill in Michigan's Kalamazoo River took much longer and was far harder than anyone had anticipated. It's now a cautionary tale for people in the middle of the new Keystone pipeline's path.
WAMU 88.5

Task Force Formed To Explore Burying D.C. Power Lines

D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray is forming a task force to explore the possibility of burying power lines in the District in response to the outages from the derecho storm earlier this summer.

WAMU 88.5

A Conservative Approach To Climate Change

One former Republican lawmaker thinks it's time for conservatives to make fixes for climate change a priority. We find out where free-market policies fit into the issue.

WAMU 88.5

Public Power To The People?

More than 2,000 communities around the country are served by publicly-owned electric utilities. What would it take to have "public power" in the Washington region?

NPR

Scorching Phoenix Plans For An Even Hotter Future

The Arizona city already logs more days over 100 degrees than any U.S. city, and climate researchers predict Phoenix will grow hotter still in the coming decades. Planners are taking the projections seriously, and are looking for ways to adapt the city and its residents to a hotter, drier reality.

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