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Gas Lines Evoke Memories Of Oil Crises In The 1970s

Back in the 1970s, U.S. drivers faced two separate oil crises that led to long lines at gas stations. Many Americans feared it would be a recurring nightmare, but gas lines have been rare over the past three decades.
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U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Chairwoman Steps Up Industry Studies

Federal officials say they support stepping up efforts to study earthquake risks at nuclear facilities.

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After Sandy, Thousands In Garrett County Still Without Power

The effects of Sandy have mostly abated in the D.C. area, but out in western Maryland, as many as 3,900 homes remain without power after Superstorm Sandy dumped feet of snow on them.

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Dominion Proposes New Natural Gas Power Plant

Dominion Virginia Power is asking the state corporation commission if it can build a new $1.3 billion natural gas power plant in Brunswick County.


Sandy Dealt Serious Blows To Fuel Supply System

Sandy dealt two serious blows to the gasoline and diesel supply system in New York and New Jersey. The storm shut down a large number of the petroleum terminals in the region. Those are the massive storage tanks that hold gasoline so tanker trucks can pick it up and take it to gas stations. Some of these terminals were damaged, while others just lost power. The storm also shut down the major pipeline that brings gasoline from the Gulf Coast. So even when fuel stations get their power back, they will have a hard time getting gasoline they need. Experts say it could be days or weeks before things return to normal.

Fixing NYC's Underground Power Grid Is No Easy Task

An army of electrical workers is squirming through the tunnels beneath New York City, checking transformers, cables and power systems. And though it'll likely take days to get everything back online, experts say the storm would have damaged aboveground infrastructure even more drastically.

Superstorm Shines A Light On Power Grid Vulnerabilities

Sandy, which knocked out power to some 8 million people in 18 states, painted a bull's-eye on the oldest and most fragile part of the nation's power grid. Engineering experts say the grid is inherently vulnerable even as damaging weather events seem to be occurring more frequently.