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NPR

Education Is Priceless But The Pricetag Is Hefty

A study indicates just half of college graduates, from 2009 to 2011, are finding work within a year. In the meantime, most grads have student loans to replay. Tim Maurer, a financial adviser in Hunt Valley, Md., talks to David Greene about the high cost of getting a college degree.
NPR

College Grads Struggle To Gain Financial Footing

A new Rutgers University survey finds just half of those who graduated from college between 2006 and 2011 are working full time. Burdened by student loan debt, and with wages depressed even for those with jobs, many say they no longer believe that education and hard work will necessarily lead to success.
WAMU 88.5

Thomas Jefferson High Named #2 Best School In U.S.

Thomas Jefferson Science and Technology High in Alexandria is ranks second among the best schools in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report. 

NPR

Fla. Court To Rule: Can A Lawyer Be Undocumented?

The Florida Board Bar of Examiners requires all applicants to have valid citizenship or immigration papers. Jose Godinez-Samperio, who has no such papers, was granted a waiver to sit for the bar exam in 2011. He passed, but now the bar says it will admit him only with approval from the state Supreme Court.
NPR

Students To Congress: Don't Let Interest Rate Double

If lawmakers can't come to an agreement, the federal Stafford loan interest rate will jump from 3.4 to 6.8 percent on July 1, adding an average of $1,000 to the cost of a year of college. Students from across the country visited Capitol Hill on Tuesday to ask Congress to keep that from happening.
NPR

Tornado Recovery Offers Joplin Students New Lessons

It's been nearly a year since a tornado tore through Joplin, Mo., destroying several school buildings. As the city rebuilds, some students have been attending a makeshift facility at the mall. Students, teachers and administrators reflect on a tumultuous year that has brought healing and hope.
WAMU 88.5

More Than 300 DCPS Jobs To Be Cut

More than 300 D.C. public school teachers have been told their jobs are being eliminated, a move that's part of the system's so-called "excessing" process.

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