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WAMU 88.5

DCPS Chief: Resources For At-Risk Students Should 'Inspire,' Not Just 'Remediate'

In response to concerns that funding for D.C.'s at-risk students is being spent inappropriately, D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson says critics should keep the big picture in mind.

NPR

Racial Awakening, Pride And Fear: One Latino Perspective On 'The Obama Effect'

Growing up as the son of Mexican immigrants, Pablo Ramirez never really thought about race. For him, the Obama years meant finding pride and a new awareness of his own racial identity in college.
NPR

9 Out Of 10 Parents Think Their Kids Are On Grade Level. They're Probably Wrong

A new national survey shows a huge disconnect between parent perceptions and student performance.
WAMU 88.5

Longest-Serving Director Of D.C. Disability Agency Departs

Laura Nuss, who led the D.C. Department on Disability Services, is departing the agency this week. Her tenure has been marked by a significant turnaround in services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
WAMU 88.5

American University President Neil Kerwin Discusses The School's Past, Present And Future

American University President Neil Kerwin joins Kojo to discuss his tenure, AU's role in our region, and the future of his campus.

NPR

A Union Firebrand Speaks Out On Politics, Testing And More

Lily Eskelsen Garcia, president of the National Education Association, looks beyond the "dark cloud" of No Child Left Behind. In the new federal law, she sees opportunity, for teachers and students.
NPR

Why Did The Superintendent Cross The Road? To Save Money For Her Schools

Tiffany Anderson serves as a crossing guard in the Jennings School District outside St. Louis, Mo. She's also the superintendent, and that's just one way she stretches district money in creative ways.
WAMU 88.5

Teachers In D.C, Maryland Keep Up The Pressure As PARCC Season Is Upon Us

D.C. and Maryland schools are gearing up to administer the PARCC tests for a second year. Kavitha Cardoza checks in on how one school is changing its preparation strategy, and she talks to an academic who studies the tests' relationship to the so-called "opportunity gap."

NPR

For 40 Years, One Texas Family Has Fought For Equal School Funding

In 1973, in a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled there's no right to equal school funding in the Constitution. But plaintiff Demetrio Rodriguez's legacy lives on — in his daughter, a teacher.
WAMU 88.5

How Georgetown University Once Relied On The Slave Trade And New Efforts To Reconcile With Its Past

In 1838, Jesuit priests at Georgetown University sold 272 slaves to keep the school afloat. Now the search is on to find the descendants. How Georgetown once relied on the slave trade – and efforts to reconcile with its past.

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