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Is Moderate Growth Good For The Economy?

Growth will remain low and consumers will be cautious as long unemployment stays high, economists say. And as long as consumers remain frugal, companies will be reluctant to hire aggressively. But is a modest rate of growth of 2 percent to 3 percent better for the U.S. in the long run?
NPR

More Pain In Spain As Economy Goes Down The Drain

Standard & Poor announced it was downgrading Spain's long-term sovereign credit rating by two notches – from "A" to "BBB+." The agency also lowered the country's short-term sovereign credit rating to "A-2" from "A-1," and said the outlook on the long-term rating is negative.
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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

The U.S. economy showed slowed growth in the first quarter of the year. The supreme court held a hearing on Arizona’s controversial immigration law. Former speaker of the house, Newt Gingrich, said he’s quitting the GOP presidential...

NPR

Almost No Change In Jobless Claims Last Week

There were 388,000 first-time claims for jobless benefits last week, down just 1,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.
NPR

Double-Dip Recession Catches Britain Off Guard

Britain is a nation in shock, following Wednesday's announcement that its economy has slipped back into recession. It's the second time since the 2008 financial crisis, and it's raising new questions about the government's unpopular austerity measures.
NPR

For Some, 'Frustration' Over Mortgage Settlement

Earlier this month, a judge approved a $25 billion settlement between five major banks and nearly all of the state attorneys general over shortcuts lenders took to push through some foreclosures. Housing counselors say the deal has yet to make an impact in communities around the country.
NPR

U.K. Enters 'Double Dip' Recession

Robert Siegel talks to Martin Wolf, chief economics commentator for the Financial Times, about the U.K.'s slide back into recession.
NPR

Small Banks Struggling Under TARP Rules

The Treasury Department's Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) was back in the news on Wednesday. The program's inspector general is warning that smaller banks are having a hard time paying back money they borrowed. Christy Romero, TARP's Special Inspector General, says the banks owe a collective $15 billion and don't have good prospects for raising the money.

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