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Alums Sue Law School After Failing To Find Work

This week, a judge dismissed a lawsuit against New York Law School filed by some of its own recent graduates. They claimed the school's marketing misled them about their chances of getting jobs as lawyers. Robert Siegel talks with Frank Raimond, an attorney who represented them, about the impact of the ruling. Raimond has been filing similar complaints against other law schools across the country.
NPR

Trying To Save A Broke City

The governor appointed David Unkovic to save Harrisburg. Now he's being sued by some of the town's residents.
NPR

Bank Of America Deal Would Turn Owners To Renters

Bank of America is reaching out to some distressed homeowners with a deal. They can stay in their homes, but as tenants. They would need to turn over the deed to the bank. Bank of America says it will help avoid foreclosures, but housing advocates don't like the plan.
WAMU 88.5

Maryland Explores Public-Private Partnerships

Maryland's legislature is considering a bill that would encourage state agencies to seek private partners on big government projects, including building and maintaining public facilities like roads, bridges, and schools. We explore the potential implications of the move.

NPR

Obama Taps Dartmouth President For World Bank's Top Job

Jim Yong Kim is a physician by training and has been a prominent figure on global health issues. He is a former director of the World Health Organization's Department of HIV/AIDS.

WAMU 88.5

Spain's Clash With Argentina Over An Oil Company

Spain had harsh words for Argentina yesterday over the nationalization of the oil firm YPF. Argentine president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner rejected the demands of the Spanish company that held a major stake in YPF for ten billion...

NPR

Fannie, Freddie Consider Mortgage Write-Downs

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have concluded that giving homeowners a big break on their mortgages would make good financial sense in many cases, NPR and ProPublica have learned. But a key regulator has resisted principal write-downs, and some economists fear they would lead to abuses.
NPR

How A City Goes Broke

Harrisburg, Pa, spent more than $300 million on a garbage incinerator. Now it has more debt per capita than any other U.S. city.

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