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NPR

Hiring's Up, So Will Obama Keep His Job?

New jobs numbers came out Friday, reporting employers added more than 100,000 workers to their payrolls. That's better than many forecasters were expecting, but not good enough for the 14 million Americans who are still out of work. NPR's Scott Horsley reports on what the numbers tell us about the economy and what they mean for President Obama.
NPR

A Look At The History Of Wall Street Protests

Guy Raz talks to Beverly Gage, associate professor of history at Yale University and author of the book The Day Wall Street Exploded: The Story of America in its First Age of Terror, about the history of protests on Wall Street.
NPR

Jobs Report Better Than Expected

Employers added 103,000 jobs in September, a stronger pace of hiring than expected. The Labor Department report is likely to ease fears that the economy is quickly hurtling toward another recession. But the jobless rate remained stuck at 9.1 percent. Hiring must pick up substantially for optimism and hope to return to the economy.
NPR

Thought The Economy Was Tanking? Not So Fast

A few weeks ago, dismal economic reports seemed to be pointing to one conclusion: The economy was slipping into another recession. But new data, including Friday's report showing employers added 103,000 jobs in September, suggest the outlook may be somewhat better than many had thought.
NPR

For Obama, Good News From New Jobs Report

The economy added 103,000 jobs last month, but the unemployment rate stayed at 9.1 percent. That's according to Friday's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Friday also marks the 10-year anniversary of the war in Afghanistan. Meanwhile, Sarah Palin and Chris Christie recently announced they'd sit out of the GOP presidential race. Michel Martin talks politics with Cynthia Tucker, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, and Mindy Finn, former advisor for Mitt Romney's 2008 presidential campaign.
NPR

Banks To Raise Debit Card Fees

Several big banks, including Bank of America and Wells Fargo are introducing new fees for debit card users. The banks say they need to do this because they are losing income from other fees that are limited by new government regulations. Ron Lieber, a personal finance columnist for The New York Times, talks to Lynn Neary about the new fees.
NPR

Mortgage Rates Hit Record Low

Mortgage rates are now below 4 percent. The average 30-year fixed-rate loan is at an all-time low. But high unemployment, weak consumer confidence, and tougher standards for getting credit, are keeping many Americans from buying homes.

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