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'Dr. Doom' Fears Another Financial Crisis Is Coming

New York University professor Nouriel Roubini says Europe's debt troubles are so profound, the continent is falling into a "recession that will get worse and worse."
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Can Eurozone Countries Actually Follow Their Own Rules This Time?

When the euro was set up in the late 1990s, the Stability and Growth Pact clearly spelled out limits for deficits and debt. But nearly everyone broke those rules, including France and Germany. Now that European leaders are trying to create new rules, the question is — how will they enforce them?
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Is There Truth In Gingrich's Remarks On The Poor?

Newt Gingrich has made controversial comments about the lack of employed role models for poor kids — and suggested that they be given jobs after school as janitors. Those who have been dealing with children and poverty for years say Gingrich's comments may be exaggerated, but there's an element of truth in what he says.
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Raise A Glass Of Butterbeer As Potter's 'Wizarding World' Comes To Hollywood

Harry Potter's theme park attraction in Orlando is so popular that they're bringing it to Hollywood. On hand for the announcement were a couple of government officials who hope the attraction will bring more than just fun and games.
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Triple-A: Are Any Assets Truly Risk-Free These Days?

Standard and Poor's warned six European countries this week that they could lose their triple-A credit ratings. In August, S&P downgraded the U.S. from its top-shelf credit status. All this raises the question of whether any assets are "risk-free" triple-A in today's unsettled global economy.
NPR

N.Y. Lawmakers Extend Millionaire Surcharge

Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York has dropped his opposition to higher income taxes on the wealthy. He and state legislative leaders have agreed to continue a surcharge on people earning more than $2 million a year. Karen DeWitt reports for New York State Public Radio.
NPR

Occupy-Inspired Protesters Lobby In Washington

Several hundred protesters calling themselves "Take Back the Capitol" are in Washington, D.C., to confront legislators with their concerns about the nation's unemployment and fiscal situation. The movement is planning several days of events and is borrowing language from Occupy Wall Street — saying Congress caters to 1 percent of Americans at the expense of the other 99 percent.

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