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Amid Debt Crisis, A Trail Of Broken 'Promises'

Financial writer Philip Coggan traces the current global financial crisis to the 1970s, when the U.S. went off the gold standard. In his book Paper Promises, Coggan says governments will have to choose whether to keep their promises to their creditors or to their citizens.

Is White, Working Class America 'Coming Apart'?

In his new book, Charles Murray, co-author of the controversial The Bell Curve, argues that in an increasingly economically stratified America, the white working class is slipping behind.

Unemployment Numbers Offer Hope And Concern

The jobs numbers at the start of 2012, shed a ray of positivity on a gloomy economic picture. Some economists warn against premature optimism. While the economy is creating jobs again, it will take years to return to full employment.

Freddie Mac Good For Business, Bad For Homeowners?

An investigation by ProPublica and NPR sheds light on questionable practices by the government-owned mortgage giant Freddie Mac. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with NPR's Chris Arnold and Arturo de los Santos, who is trying to save his house.

After Deep Cuts, New Mexico Now Has Budget Surplus

In New Mexico, state lawmakers are figuring out what to do with a budget surplus. Republicans want to give some of the money to businesses, in the form of tax breaks. Democrats want to restore some of the cuts to services made over the last three years.

In Idaho, Two Workers Take Jobs, And Hope For Best

Before the recession, Idaho had one of the fastest growing economies in the country. But last year, its jobless rate peaked at nearly 10 percent. That number has begun to creep down – but many workers in the state are still struggling to replace the jobs they've lost.

Sarkozy Sews Up Seamstress' Unemployment Fix

For most of the 20th century, high-end lingerie maker Lejaby has done well. But in 2010 it closed three factories. And now it is shuttering its last, the only place where French lingerie is still made in France. Until President Nicolas Sarkozky stepped in, 93 seamstresses were going to be unemployed.

Stopping The 'Brain Drain' Of The U.S. Economy

Recent surveys show that a large percentage of graduates from the nation's top schools are taking jobs in consulting or finance. But students at some top schools have begun protesting recruitment drives by financial firms in an effort to steer students away from the financial sector.