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No June Gloom For American Auto Sales

Recovery has been creeping at a slow pace for much of the American economy, but sales by US auto makers have revved up. Chrysler and General Motors both saw double digit growth in June, and Ford wasn't too far behind. Guest host Maria Hinojosa and NPR's Sonari Glinton talk about what's driving the rise.
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Calorie Police: Legislating How Much We Eat

From limiting sales of large sodas to requiring calorie counts on restaurant menus, lawmakers are trying to help Americans slim down and eat healthy. What it takes to modify behavior at the dinner table.


A Bootstraps-Up Approach To Greece's Debt Crisis

Peter Nomikos, a young shipping heir whose family helped turn the Greek island of Santorini into a tourist hot spot, is trying to help Greece dig out of its massive debt with a new charity that asks average Greeks to chip in.

Raising Minimum Wage: A Help Or Harm?

The federal minimum wage stands at $7.25, and there's a growing call for hourly workers to earn more. There's a bill in the Senate to boost the national minimum wage, but some say it would do more harm than good for businesses and the economy.
WAMU 88.5

Low Mortgage Rates Prompt D.C. Area Home Sales

Home sales are up in the D.C. Metro area due to record-low mortgage rates.


Jobs Back At Political Forefront

Guest host David Greene talks with NPR's Mara Liasson about the week in politics, including the jobs report, Romney's problems with conservatives and public opinion after the health care ruling.

What Does London's LIBOR Mean To The U.S.?

A scandal introduced many to LIBOR this week, key interest rates used to regulate everything from credit cards to student loans in the global economy. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz and guests explain just how big the LIBOR scandal could get and why we here in the U.S. should care.
WAMU 88.5

Maryland Lawmakers Continue Gambling Talks

Gov. Martin O'Malley will not call a special session next week to discuss gambling expansion, even though a decision has not been made.


Scranton's Public Workers Now Paid Minimum Wage

The Pennsylvania city has slashed the pay for all its public employees — including firefighters and police — to $7.25 per hour. Mayor Chris Doherty says there isn't enough money in the bank to pay full wages.