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How Property Taxes Climb, Even If Home Value Drops

Millions of homeowners are finding out that their property taxes are either holding steady or rising. Their houses, however, may be worth much less, and there may not be much they can do about it. The economic downturn, state laws and property appraisals have created some surprises.
NPR

'Buy Here, Pay Here' Businesses Move Into Leasing

Robert Siegel speaks with Ken Bensinger, business reporter for the Los Angeles Times, for an update about a growing type of lucrative used-car dealerships known as "buy here, pay here" businesses. He explains how these lots now have gone into the leasing business in a big way.
NPR

Q&A: Why Such A Low Tax Rate For Romney?

GOP candidate Mitt Romney says his effective tax rate is 15 percent. Why so low? The answer lies in a theory that if you tax investment too high, economic growth and job creation are discouraged. But it's somewhat controversial, not least because most of the people who get to pay that lower rate are well-off.
NPR

Jobless Claims Drop, Inflation At 3 Percent, Housing Starts Cool

First-time claims for unemployment insurance plunged by 50,000 last week from the week before, to 352,000. They're now near a four-year low.
NPR

So, Um, What Is A Private Equity Firm?

GOP presidential candidates have clashed over Bain Capital, the firm Mitt Romney formerly headed. In the "private equity" investing world, only wealthy individuals and large institutions, such as pension funds, are welcome. That's Bain's world.
NPR

How Oklahoma City Avoided Economic Pitfalls

As the Mayor's Conference takes place in Washington D.C., city governments are dealing with severe problems at home — from high unemployment to funding cuts. Steve Inskeep talks to Mick Cornett, the Mayor of Oklahoma City, about how his city has managed to avoid some of these problems.
NPR

Manufacturing Industry Gained Momentum In 2011

Manufacturing jobs in the U.S. had a strong finish in 2011, according to the Federal Reserve.That advance is expected to carry over into 2012. David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, talks to Renee Montagne about what the data means for the anemic global economy.

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