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NPR

One Jobs Report, Two Different Political Spins

In September, employers added 114,000 workers and the unemployment rate fell to 7.8 percent. As President Obama notes, job growth is steady. But as his rival Mitt Romney points out, job increases have not kept pace with population growth.
NPR

Does Jobs Report Mean Things Are Getting Better?

For the first time in nearly four years, unemployment is below 8 percent. It's already heating up the election discussion on the economy. But Wednesday's debate left some confused about where the candidates stand. Host Michel Martin looks at the candidates' economic platforms with NPR's Marilyn Geewax and The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy.
NPR

Labor Secretary Says Talk Of Fudged Jobless Numbers Is Insulting

Today's news about a drop in the unemployment rate has some of President Obama's critics speculating about cooked books. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis says such talk is "ludicrous."
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D.C. Combines Health Care Exchanges For Individuals, Small Biz

D.C. is considering a move to combine the city's health care exchange for individuals with one for small businesses as part of its efforts to comply with the Affordable Care Act. 

NPR

Unemployment Rate Drops To 7.8 Percent; 114,000 Jobs Added To Payrolls

The news is sure to be a hot topic on the campaign trail.
NPR

September's 7.8 Jobless Rate A Boost For Obama

For the first time since President Obama took office, the unemployment rate is back at 7.8 percent, the Labor Department reported Friday. It's been above 8 percent for nearly four years. The number of new jobs added was in line with expectations — 114,000.
NPR

No One Trusts China's Unemployment Rate

China's national statistics office works hard, but the country is so big and changing so quickly that it's hard to keep track of what's going on.
NPR

Not Everyone In Spain Eager To Wager On EuroVegas

U.S. casino mogul, billionaire and Republican donor Sheldon Adelson has chosen debt-ridden Spain as the location for a $35 billion European gambling megacity. "EuroVegas" in Madrid could bring up to 250,000 much-needed jobs. But residents are divided over whether casinos are the kind of development they want.

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