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NPR

States Go To Casinos, But Does The Gamble Pay Off?

Maryland and Ohio are the latest states turning to casinos to help address tight budgets. The Philadelphia Inquirer's Suzette Parmley reports on gambling and says that nationwide, casinos brought in about $33 billion in 2011. Parmley speaks with host Michel Martin about the growth of legal gaming and the potential costs to the people who play.
NPR

Daycare Needs Stretch Around The Clock

As more people take shift work in the still struggling economy, the need for after hours child care has increased. Throughout the country, many daycare centers have begun offering evening hours or 24-hour care. Parents say their kids should be sleeping at home at night, but they have no choice but to work when jobs are available.
NPR

Obama's 'Clean Coal' Fighting Words To W.Va. Dems

How can an inmate beat out a sitting president in his party's primary? In parts of West Virginia, the answer is easy to explain. Just ask those who say Obama's policies threaten the culture of coal.
NPR

As Strikes Wane, Caterpillar Workers Hold The Line

About 800 machinists at an Illinois Caterpillar plant are entering their third month on strike. Strikes of large numbers of workers were relatively common in the 1970s, but today, work stoppages of this size — and this length — are rare.
NPR

Factories Scaling Back Amid Economic Slide

Manufacturing, seen as a recent bright spot in the economy, contracted in June. It was the first monthly downturn in three years. Analysts cited several factors for the surprising downturn, including recession in Europe and slower growth in China. A pullback in factory activity could spell trouble for the U.S. economy unless another key sector — construction — gains true momentum.
NPR

Buried In Debt, Young People Find Dreams Elusive

At 30, Michelle Holshue is already making more than her parents do. But she graduated with $140,000 in student loan debt just as the recession hit. Like many young adults, Holshue is worried she'll never be able to own a home or raise a family.

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