Commentary | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Commentary

RSS Feed
NPR

Week In Politics: High Court On Health Care

Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of the New York Times. They discuss the latest from the campaign trail, and next week's health care arguments at the Supreme Court.
NPR

'Mad Men' Returns On Sunday, To The Delight Of Its Excitable Fans

Mad Men is returning after a long hiatus this Sunday. NPR's Elizabeth Blair looks at the reasons for the delay and what it might mean to fans.

NPR

Two Lost Souls Find Each Other In A Hospital

Winslow Jackson and Dorothy Biebrich were two divorced singles struggling to deal with multiple sclerosis when they met in 2006. Six years later, the two hope they are good examples of how to live life. Now, if one of their scooters goes down, the other one can pull or push to help.

NPR

An Open Letter ... About Open Letters

We tweet the most private thought or deed on Twitter, plaster it on a Facebook wall, upload it to YouTube. In this era of total openness — open criticism, open primaries and open relationships — is it time to close the book on open letters?

NPR

Skirting The Job: 3 Secretaries With Novel Ideas

Author and secretary Lynn Peril knows that writing on the job is a time-honored tradition. She recommends three books that were written while the boss was looking the other way. Have you ever composed a novel at your day job? Tell us about it in the comments.
NPR

Trayvon Martin Was Afraid, Too

The shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African American teen, has sparked national protests and debate. Host Michel Martin reflects on the case in her Can I Just Tell You essay.
NPR

Are Primary Republicans Chasing Romney Or The Reagan Rainbow?

Were he around today, one wonders if Ronald Reagan would have the chance to grow into the figure he became.
NPR

Americans Hit The Brakes On NASCAR

NASCAR spent millions of dollars researching how to get people more interested in the sport, but Americans' love affair with cars isn't what it used to be.

Pages