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Learning The Hard Way Why You Just Shouldn't GetTooClose

In India, writer Deepak Singh was always bumping up against humanity. In the U.S., he found out about personal space. And he wonders: Is something lost when you have to keep your distance?
NPR

Calls To Remove Confederate Flag Challenge Southern Orthodoxy

Tony Horwitz, author of Confederates in the Attic, says this week's calls to remove Confederate symbols mark the collapse of a stubborn Southern orthodoxy.
NPR

Charleston Stirs Memories Of Young Birmingham Bombing Victim

Decades before the deadly shootings at a South Carolina church, a church bombing killed four girls in Alabama. A friend of one of the girls describes the emotional scars both incidents have left.
NPR

Some Find It Difficult To Heed Calls For Racial Healing After Charleston, S.C.

At a prayer vigil for victims in the recent South Carolina church shooting, professor Chenjerai Kumanyika found himself unable to join hands with a white woman — and he wondered why.
NPR

Letters: Confederate Flag Debate

NPR's Audie Cornish and Rachel Martin respond to listener letters about the Confederate flag.
NPR

A Father, A Daughter And A Continent Between Them

Jon Kalish loved his daughter from afar, with calls and visits from New York to California. And he lost her from afar too — first when they became estranged, and then in a more final way.
NPR

What Do You Think Of When You Hear The Word 'Refugee'?

The United Nations says there are nearly 60 million refugees around the world. NPR's Scott Simon reflects on what it means to be a refugee, from the lives they leave behind to the struggles they face.
NPR

Week In Politics: Charleston, S.C., Shooting, Papal Encyclical

NPR's Melissa Block talks with regular political commentators David Brooks of The New York Times and E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution about this week's mass shooting in Charleston, S.C., Pope Francis' encyclical on the environment, and pending decisions from the Supreme Court.
NPR

Letters: Rachel Dolezal Raises Questions About Racial Identity

NPR's Melissa Block and Audie Cornish read listener letters about race and identity in light of Rachel Dolezal's resignation as president of the NAACP chapter in Spokane, Wash. Dolezal says she identifies as black, though her parents say she is white.
NPR

Awards For Athletes Should Honor Unsung Heroes

If ESPN wants to honor selfless players, it should give awards for courage to unknown people who achieve great feats.

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