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'Ides Of March': These Days, All Politics Is Lowball

An idealistic campaign press secretary (Ryan Gosling) finds himself in the middle of a scandal that could threaten his candidate's chances of becoming president.
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Remembering A Man And A Marriage

Mary knew Thomas was the one for her when she met him at his mother's funeral in 1991. They married less than 90 days later.
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Nobel Literature Winner Tomas Transtromer: The Beauty of Stillness

Tomas Transtromer, Swedish poet of still and solitary landscapes, is this year's winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. A private man in his work and life, Transtromer has nonetheless been one of Europe's most translated poets of the last 50 years.
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Do Rising Costs Have 'The Simpsons' On The Ropes?

Commentator Andrew Wallenstein says the pressures on The Simpsons to cut costs present a very real threat to a television institution.
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The Luxurious Revenue College Sports Model

Football picks up most of the bills for all the other college sports that lose money. Should an athletic department be funded on the shoulder pads of poor kids?
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Drafting My Fantasy Picks & Tackling Nobel Trends

It's been a surprising year for the Nobel Prize. But there's no fooling commentator Dennis O'Toole — he's been plotting his picks like drafts for the Super Bowl.
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Unlike Most Marxist Jargon, 'Class Warfare' Persists

Words like "proletariat" and "masses" have largely left the lexicon, but linguist Geoff Nunberg says "class warfare" is a specter that haunts the English language — whenever there are appeals for making the rich pay more.
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These Days, Everyone Dares Call It Treason

Treason is the only crime defined in the U.S. Constitution and is considered by many to be the worst of all crimes against society. So when one politician accuses another of treason, that should be a serious charge, right? Not so much, as it turns out.
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Stevens Chronicles 'Five Chiefs' Of The Supreme Court

John Paul Stevens' new memoir is framed as a discussion about the office of the chief justice; it includes a brief history of the nation's first 12 chief justices, followed by thorough descriptions of the five he knew well. Stevens, now 91, retired in 2010 after nearly 35 years on the Supreme Court.
NPR

Immigrants' Status Explored In 'Barbarian Nurseries'

In his new novel, Hector Tobar explores the inconsistencies in the country's dependence on illegal immigrants even as some Americans persist in keeping them at arm's length.

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