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Week In Politics: Santorum Makes His Exit

Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of the New York Times. They discuss the latest in politics, including the end of Rick Santorum's campaign for the Republican presidential nomination.
NPR

I Died On The Titanic

Titanic the musical, that is. NPR.org's Dana Farrington played a drowning victim as an eight-grader in 2002. The costumes and set were memorable in a good way, she says. But portraying the tragic ordeal was a bit creepy.
NPR

Colleagues Recall L.A. Riots Unfolding Like 'A Movie'

Two decades after the Los Angeles riots, three former colleagues from the city's KJLH radio station recall watching the violence unfold from their studio window on Crenshaw Boulevard. The music station switched to an all-talk format for several days, as listeners called in to share what they were witnessing across the city.
NPR

Hellbent For Living: A Screwball Parisian Adventure

There are many books set in the so-called City of Light, but author Rosecrans Baldwin says that none are quite as charming as The Dud Avocado. Have a favorite tale set in France? Let us know what it is in the comments.
NPR

Snark And Sass: 3 Books On The True Nature Of Paris

Many people think of Paris as a city of sophistication and beauty. But author Amy Thomas knows that living there isn't always fun. She recommends three books that show how frustrating, judgmental, and maddening Paris can be. Have you ever lived abroad? Tell us about your experience in the comments.
NPR

The DOJ E-Book Lawsuit: Is It 1934 All Over Again?

The Department of Justice's lawsuit against Apple and five major publishers for e-book price fixing sent shivers through the industry — but Jason Boog says this fraught relationship between American publishers, retailers and the DOJ goes back to the Great Depression.
NPR

The NCAA: Is Membership Worth It?

Following Kentucky's college basketball victory, commentator Frank Deford wonders about the ethics of the NCAA.

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