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Politician Takes To Tinder To Ignite Voters' Interest

Greggor Ilagan, a Hawaii politician running for higher office, used Tinder to reach potential voters. Now, says NPR's Scott Simon, Ilagan is taking a more traditional approach: walking door to door.
NPR

Sometimes, You Have To Pass The Ball

Cities lose sports teams, as occasionally things have to change, and that's just part of life, according to sports commentator Frank Deford.
NPR

Has The World Learned The Wrong Lessons From The Ebola Outbreak?

By focusing on the end of the epidemic, writes infectious disease specialist Nahid Bhadelia, we miss the larger point.
NPR

Playboy Mansion For Sale, Bunnies Not Included

One might think the Playboy Mansion is all fun and games, but for $200 million, it might not be worth the cost, says NPR's Scott Simon.
NPR

A Mother's Question To Protect Her Kids: Do You Keep Guns?

Commentator Dede Donahue didn't always think about the guns she couldn't see. That is, until she had children. She first wrote about her experience in the Washington Post.
NPR

The Accidental Wheelman Of Martin Luther King Jr.

In the mid-'60s, Tom Houck left high school to join the civil rights movement. But he never expected he'd become the personal driver to the movement's leader — mostly because he had a license.
NPR

Going Away Without 'Ghosting': A Better Way To Say 'I'm Not Into You'

The simple answer? Honesty. Commentator Sarah Hepola says that once she learned how to turn down dates with men she wasn't interested in, it became much easier to say yes to the ones she liked.
NPR

Everyone Uses Singular 'They,' Whether They Realize It Or Not

The singular, gender-neutral usage of "they" is now acceptable on college campuses, among the genderqueer and in the Washington Post. Linguist Geoff Nunberg traces the rise of the new "they."
NPR

Soccer, The Normal-Sized Player's Game

It's called "the beautiful game," but sports commentator Frank Deford says that's because of who plays soccer, not because of how it's played.
NPR

Goodbye Jobs, Hello 'Gigs': How One Word Sums Up A New Economic Reality

Once used by '50s hipsters to connote a no-strings-attached job, "gig" has been co-opted by venture capitalists hyping the new economic order. Linguist Geoff Nunberg reflects on the word's resurgence.

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