Business

RSS Feed
NPR

How Washington Chose Not To Be Careful With Spending Cuts

No rational person would try to cut nearly all government spending by a fixed amount, regardless of the individual merit of any given program. That's kind of the point.
NPR

Job Applicants Are Wary Of Firms' Resume Sorting Software

Some big companies are using talent management software to narrow the pool of job applicants before an employer reviews the resumes. Human resources officials say in today's economy, the systems are crucial. But employment seekers often find the software puts them at a disadvantage.
NPR

Milwaukee Brewer's Missing Sausage Costume Is Returned

The Italian sausage costume disappeared earlier this month. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported that the sausage was seen bar-hopping. It's not clear if anyone will get the reward: a year's supply of mustard and sauerkraut
NPR

States, Federal Regulators Warm To Online Gambling

For years federal regulators cracked down on online gambling, deeming it illegal. But in 2011, the Justice Department changed its mind and now states are beginning to see an opportunity. Renee Montagne talks to David Schwartz of the Center for Gaming Research at the University of Nevada Las Vegas about these new laws, and what they mean for the future of gambling.
NPR

Ag Department Warns Budget Cuts Will Affect Food Inspectors

The secretary of Agriculture says if the sequester cuts go into effect, he'll have to furlough food safety inspectors. What would that mean for food companies and consumers?
NPR

Sequester Cuts Could Affect Air Safety

At a hearing on Capitol Hill Wednesday, FAA administrator Michael Huerta explained to lawmakers what the sequester means to the aviation industry. He said he has limited ability to avoid furloughs for key personnel, such as air traffic controllers. That could lead to delays for passengers and the closing of towers.
NPR

Non-Profit Hopes To Get Kids Excited About Computer Coding

It's expected that more than one million software and programming jobs will open up in the United States between now and 2020. But the country's educational system is not on track to train enough people to fill those jobs.

Pages