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Japan Recruits Girl Band To Sell Bonds

The Japanese government has launched a campaign aimed at selling bonds to help fund reconstruction of areas hit by last year's earthquake and tsunami. It recruited the popular girl band AKB48, known for hits like "Baby Baby Bay," to help promote the bonds.
NPR

Forget Big-Box Stores. How About A Big-Box House?

Using recycled materials is increasingly common in building construction. But some architects are taking the green movement a step further, creating entire homes and businesses from discarded shipping containers. They call it cargotecture.
NPR

From An Israeli Kibbutz, A High-Priced Caviar Prized By Top Chefs

One of the world's most treasured foods comes from an unlikely source — a sturgeon farm on a kibbutz in Northern Israel. The prized sturgeon eggs — or osetra caviar, if you must — fetches a hefty price and has a top chef following.
WAMU 88.5

Opening Day Nears For Arundel Mills Casino

The $500 million Maryland Live! Casino in Arundel Mills is poised to open June 6, adding more than 330,000 square feet of gaming space to the state.

NPR

Lawyers, Not Victims, Making Most In Madoff Cleanup

Robert Siegel talks with New York Times editor and business columnist Andrew Ross Sorkin about Irving Picard, the court-appointed trustee working to recover funds for the victims of Bernie Madoff's Ponzi scheme. So far, Picard's firm has generated $554 million in legal and other fees.
NPR

On The Economic Ladder, Rungs Move Further Apart

Many Americans have long believed that the United States is a land of opportunity, where anyone who works hard can climb the economic ladder. But evidence from recent decades indicates that, for many Americans, that dream of economic mobility falls short.
NPR

Who Decides Whether This 26-Year-Old Woman Gets A Lung Transplant?

Ashley Dias needs lungs. So do lots of other patients. Scarcity is a problem with organ transplants, and, unlike other scarce resources, organs can't be bought or sold. Here's how doctors decide who gets to be at the top of the waiting list.

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