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Mexico's Tax Overhaul Has Middle Class Crying Foul

Mexico's president has unveiled a major shakeup of the country's tax system. His administration says it's aimed at capturing more of Mexico's paltry tax collection. Critics say it's unfairly targeting the middle class. Among the items slated for taxing: dog food and private school tuition.
NPR

Village People Singer Wins Copyright Case

Victor Willis has finally won a share of the income from his most famous song. The New York Times reports Willis, you know him as the police officer, has emerged from six years of legal wrestling with a new copyright in hand. The victory gives him substantial control over "YMCA" and 32 other Village People tunes.
NPR

Calif. City Proposes Unique Plan To Avoid Foreclosures

A federal judge in San Francisco on Thursday hears arguments over a radical plan to stem the foreclosure crisis. The City of Richmond is proposing to buy underwater mortgages in order to help keep local residents in their homes. If banks don't want to sell those mortgages, the city says it is prepared to invoke eminent domain to seize the mortgages.
NPR

A Check On The Housing Industry

Millions of American homeowners are underwater — that is they owe more than their house is worth. That number though is falling as home prices rise, and as more houses get foreclosed on.
NPR

Mill Closing Is 'Major Setback' For Ala. Town

International Paper will close a mill in Courtland, Alabama, that employs more than 1,000 workers. The company blamed a decline in the demand for paper products in the U.S. for the decision. It said the shutdown will be completed in about six months.
NPR

Two Years On, Protesters Still Fighting Wisconsin Governor

In 2011, Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill stripping collective bargaining rights from most public employees, sparking massive protests at the state Capitol. While most demonstrators eventually went away, a small group did not.
NPR

Long Before Most, Intel Chased The Smart Watch

Long before smart watches became the latest pursuit for tech companies, Gordon Moore of Intel was experimenting with wristwatch computers. Intel's co-founder and his colleagues built a line of chip-powered watches in the late '70s. The concept was visionary, but the business was a failure. Moore now keeps a memento that he calls his "$15 million watch."
NPR

Missouri Tax Posturing May Influence Other States

State lawmakers failed to override the governor's veto of a controversial measure that would have lowered state income taxes. Although Republicans had supermajorities in the House and Senate, Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon was able to rally school districts, which feared their budgets would suffer from the decline in general revenue.
NPR

5 Years After Financial Crisis, Are Big Banks Still A Threat?

It's been five years since Lehman Brothers collapsed and touched off a banking crisis that is still being felt by the global economy. Today, the banking industry is a lot stronger than it was, but some critics say efforts to reform banking regulations have fallen short of their potential.
NPR

Tired Of Inequality? One Economist Says It'll Only Get Worse

In his new book, Average Is Over, Tyler Cowen predicts that America will become a new, more creative meritocracy. Though he believes a rise in income inequality is inevitable, he hopes that "happiness inequality isn't going up in the same way."

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