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NPR

Plucky Former Poultry Farmer Goes Wild For Gators

Georgia is well known for its agricultural products, such as peaches, peanuts and chickens. Now, in the tiny town of Camilla, one farm is turning out an unusual item that's in big demand in Europe's high-fashion industry: alligators.
NPR

What's Going Wrong With China's Solar Industry?

Steve Inskeep talks to Beijing-based economist Patrick Chovanec about too many subsidies in China's solar energy industry. It is resulting in money-losing companies. One company, Suntech, could soon be delisted from the New York Stock Exchange because it is performing poorly.
NPR

Living Social Steps Up To The Plate

The Washington Nationals are in the Major League Baseball playoffs this year but the games will end after public transit has closed. In the past, pro sports organizations have paid deposits to keep the metro system running overtime. But the Nationals said they wouldn't pay. So Living Social spotted a PR opportunity, and came up the $30,000 deposit.
NPR

World Bank Predicts Slower Growth In East Asia

The World Bank warns of a deeper and longer slowdown in the region driven by weak exports and domestic demand. At the center of this is an accelerated slowdown in China, where the bank cut its annual growth rate prediction, lowering it to 7.7 percent, about half a point down.
NPR

You Ask, We Answer: Candidates On Housing, Taxes

Which housing programs would Mitt Romney eliminate? What would President Obama do to the tax code? NPR reporters read between the lines of the candidates' positions on housing and tax policies.
NPR

Taxes Are Certain, But What About Romney's Cuts?

Gov. Mitt Romney started his campaign calling for big tax breaks for the middle class. Over time his goals for those breaks have expanded to maintaining the government's flow of income and creating jobs. In the end, will a middle-class tax cut still be possible?
NPR

Unemployment Numbers Are Kept Under Guard

The unemployment rate has dropped to 7.8 percent — that's the lowest rate in President Obama's presidency. Numbers like these are calculated and released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and highly anticipated by not only politicians but money managers and traders around the world. In the run up to the release, the government office does everything possible to keep these numbers locked up. (This piece initially aired Aug. 3, 2012 on Morning Edition.)

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