Business | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Business

RSS Feed
NPR

Facebook Narrowly Beats Revenue Expectations; Market Isn't Impressed

The company released its first earnings report as a publically traded company Thursday.
NPR

The Disagreement Behind Our Economic Platform

Getting economists of different stripes to agree on Planet Money's six policy proposals wasn't easy — and panel member Dean Baker says the disagreements matter.
NPR

Jobless Claims Drop, Previous Week's Increase Erased

The decline was a surprise. Economists say the Labor Department has been having difficulty applying "seasonal adjustments" to the figures because of changes in the timing of annual shutdowns at auto plants.
NPR

In Drought-Stricken Midwest, It's Fodder Vs. Fuel

As the drought continues to afflict the nation's corn belt, hog and chicken farmers are competing with ethanol factories for scarce and increasingly expensive corn. Meat producers say it's not a fair competition, because government rules call for a minimum level of ethanol production, no matter what the cost. They're campaigning for a suspension of those rules.
NPR

Ichiro Fans In Japan Scramble For Yankees Gear

Ichiro Suzuki's move from the Seattle Mariners to the New York Yankees seems to be popular with his fans back in Japan — even though they now have to dash out and buy new memorabilia with the Yankees logo to show their support.
NPR

Church Steeples Doubling As Cellphone Towers

Cellphone carriers are having a hard time finding places to build new towers, so they're making deals with churches to put antennas in steeples. The Baltimore Sun reports that the churches get more than $1,000 a month for each antenna. A half-dozen congregations in the Baltimore area have now leased out their bell towers.
NPR

Caterpillar Inc. Strike Continues Amid Record Profits

Illinois-based Caterpillar Inc. reported soaring second-quarter profits amid growing demand for its heavy construction and mining equipment, and it's on pace for record profits for the year. But three months into a strike by hundreds of workers at a suburban Chicago plant, Cat refuses to sweeten the "last, best offer" that would freeze pay, reduce pension benefits and increase health care costs. The CEO says Cat is ready to cut costs even more if the economy should weaken.

Pages