Business

RSS Feed
NPR

Chuck Foley, Co-Created Twister, Dies At 82

Charles "Chuck" Foley and his business partner Neil Rabens invented the game for Milton Bradley in 1966. Twister is now manufactured by Hasbro Inc., and the company says it remains a top seller.
NPR

Will A Health Insurer Sponsor The Next 'Jackass' Movie?

Soon, all Americans will have to buy health insurance or pay a fine. This sounds like a marketer's dream. But when the product you're selling is health insurance, there are some pitfalls.
NPR

Report: Microsoft Helped NSA, FBI Get Around Encryption

The latest Guardian report on U.S. electronic surveillance says the company granted accesses to email and chat services.
WAMU 88.5

Dr. Sid Wolfe: Consumer Health Advocate

Dr. Sid Wolfe on the effort to ensure the safety of prescription drugs and his 40-year career as a consumer health advocate.

NPR

Bernanke's Comments Give Stocks A Lift

Stocks surged Thursday after the chief of the Federal Reserve sent signals that the central bank wasn't in a hurry to stop helping the economy. In early afternoon trading, key U.S. indexes were up about 1 percent.
NPR

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week

The increase — of 16,000 claims — may be mostly due to seasonal shutdowns of auto plants, which are retooling.
WAMU 88.5

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

House Republicans overwhelmingly resist comprehensive immigration overhaul. President Barack Obama's nominee to head the FBI answers questions about domestic surveillance. And the Boston Marathon bombing suspect pleads not guilty. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top domestic news stories.

NPR

Senator Express Concerns About Smithfield Foods Merger

Smithfield CEO Larry Pope tried to reassure lawmakers that the sale of his Virginia based company will not mean a transfer of jobs to China or a reduction in food safety. He appeared before lawmakers on the Senate Agriculture Committee on Wednesday.
NPR

Business News

David Greene has business news.
NPR

Wal-Mart Fumes Over D.C. Council Wage Vote

Over the strong objections of Wal-Mart, the City Council in Washington D.C. has approved a bill that would require some large retailers to pay workers a minimum of $12.50 an hour. The city's minimum wage is $8.25. Wal-Mart has threatened to scrap plans to open three stores in the city if the measure is signed by the mayor and becomes law. Patrick Madden of member station WAMU reports.

Pages