Business

RSS Feed
NPR

Yahoo's Stock Soars, Sales Remain Flat

There's been excitement on Wall Street about a turnaround at Yahoo since Marissa Mayer became head of the company last year. Mayer has completed high profile acquisitions and sought to improve worker morale. Second quarter revenues missed expectations as Yahoo struggled to corral advertising dollars.
NPR

In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

Government investigators are trying to solve an agricultural whodunit: How did genetically engineered wheat that was never approved for sale end up in a farmer's field in Oregon? Some are raising the possibility of sabotage; others suspect simple human error.
NPR

Fangs And Fishnets For The Win: 'Goth Barbie' Is Monstrously Successful

Barbie sales have slumped. But Monster High is doing great. That's another line of dolls from Mattel — imagine even skinnier Barbies that look like they've been designed by Tim Burton. And the Monster High dolls have been a success, spawning hordes of ghoulish imitators.
NPR

'Living Wage' Laws Create Both Winners And Losers

Wal-Mart's long-standing plans to come to Washington, D.C., are now up in the air. The city council passed a living wage law that would require the world's largest retailer to pay $12.50 an hour, more than the city's current $8.25 minimum wage. To learn more about living wage bills throughout the country, Audie Cornish speaks to David Neumark, professor of economics and director of the Center for Economics and Public Policy at the University of California, Irvine.
NPR

Can Oysters With No Sex Life Repopulate The Chesapeake Bay?

Scientists and watermen have joined forces to plant underwater farms in the Chesapeake with a special oyster bred to be sterile. Instead of using energy to reproduce, these oysters use it all to grow — twice as fast as normal.
NPR

D.C. Wage Rift Puts Spotlight On Wal-Mart's Urban Push

Wal-Mart's plans to come to Washington, D.C., are up in the air after the City Council voted to require the world's largest retailer to pay workers a living wage. The case highlights some of the difficulties — and opportunities — big-box stores sometimes face entering urban markets.
NPR

Local Sake: America's Craft Brewers Look East For Inspiration

Many Americans have encountered sake as that hot, cloudy beverage served in sushi bars. But now, the good stuff is coming. High-end imports from Japan are up, and many bars now focus on sake. Best of all, perhaps, are the microbreweries popping up across the country.
NPR

Community Supported Agriculture: How Big Is Too Big?

Large CSAs with thousands of members are usually part of farms with more complex business models. Sometimes that complexity can lead to debt and other problems.
NPR

In Argentina, Coca-Cola Tests Market For 'Green' Coke

Argentina is the site of the global kickoff of what Coke is describing as a "natural" and "green" lower-calorie cola. Coca-Cola Life contains stevia instead of sugar, and comes in a bottle that's made partially from plants.
NPR

Former Goldman Sachs Vice President Goes On Trial

Three years ago the Securities and Exchange Commission filed civil charges against Goldman Sachs and one of its traders, Fabrice Tourre. They were charged with misleading investors over mortgage-backed securities. Goldman settled and agreed to pay $550 million. Tourre's trial began Monday in a Manhattan court room.

Pages